Test Design

Articles

The Value of Really Dumb Tests

When you start writing unit tests, the tests that seem useful might be too involved to give a quick payback. The ones you write quickly might seem too trivial to add value. By starting with small, seemingly simple tests, you can both overcome the inertia that stops you from testing and add value to your project.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
James Bach From One Expert to Another: James Bach

In this installment of From One Expert to Another, Jon Bach uses a 20 Questions approach to interview his brother, James Bach, about his reputation, his work as a tester and consultant, his thoughts on the global testing community, and more.

Jon Bach's picture Jon Bach
Writing Good Test Cases

We all know writing test cases is an integral part of the testing activity. In order to write good test cases, we must first understand what a test case is and why we need to write test cases. Can’t we live without writing test cases?

Anand Gupta's picture Anand Gupta
Thoughts from Mid-Project

My team is in the middle of one of the hardest projects—we call them "themes"—we’ve ever tackled. We’re a high-functioning agile team that has helped our company grow and succeed over several years now—we “went agile” in 2003. Here’s one thing I know for sure: No matter how many problems you solve, new challenges will pop up.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Acceptance Test-Driven Development: Not as Optional as You Think

The components of software processes work together in important and sometimes unrecognized ways. The removal of one of those components will affect the others. In this article, which originally appeared in the August 2010 issue of the Iterations eNewsletter, Jennitta Andrea takes a look at the value of acceptance test-driven development and the costs of making it an optional practice.

Jennitta Andrea's picture Jennitta Andrea
Getting to Know Conformiq CEO Antti Huima

Antti Huima is president and CEO of Conformiq. In this interview, he discusses what brought him to where he is now, his company's strategy, and his current interests.

Suzanne Douglas
Exploring the Subtle Differences Between Agile Paradigms

In recent years within the object oriented and agile community, several approaches to software design and development have materialized and are in use by professional software developers. Test-Driven Development (TDD), Domain-Driven Design (DDD), Behavior-Driven Design (BDD) and Feature-Driven Design (FDD) are some of the more well known approaches. While these philosophies all imbibe the classic agile principles of an incremental and iterative mindset to software development, they subtly differ from each other.

Nirav Assar's picture Nirav Assar
Transitioning to Agile Testing

Your developers are already working feature-by-feature in iterations, but your testers are stuck with manual tests. How do you make the leap to agile testing when the nature of agile's iterative releases challenges testers to test working segments of a product instead of the complete package? In this column, Johanna Rothman explains that the key challenge resides in bringing the whole team together to work towards the completion of an iteration. Only then will the testers—and the entire team—know how to transition to agile.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Kill by Wire

Linda Hayes has worked in the software industry for a long time and through a lot of changes. But a series of recent events has led her to question whether the industry has changed for the better or worse. In this article, she recommends some attitudes we should lose and some we should adopt in order to save our software and—in some cases—our lives.

Linda Hayes's picture Linda Hayes
The "One Right Way"

For those who believe there has to be one right way to do something, especially in software development - there can be. But that one way isn't likely to come from a single individual. Through collaboration and teamwork, some of the greatest single ideas have evolved.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin

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