Test Design

Articles

Collection of random numbers When a Number Is Not a Number: Benefits of Random Test Generators

We like to hope that we will consider all possible situations when devising our tests, but it’s all too easy to overlook the unusual cases. That’s the benefit of random test generators. We might feel comfortable after testing a few dozen test cases; these tools generate hundreds. With more stuff getting tossed at the wall, there is a greater likelihood that something interesting sticks.

Steve Poling
Brain made out of a circuit board Leveraging Machine Learning to Predict Test Coverage

Test coverage is an important metric within test management, and as technology evolves, we‘re able to leverage new trends to predict coverage. Weka, an open source suite of machine learning software, can take your test management beyond spreadsheets to the latest AI technologies, letting you predict your test coverage earlier with greater accuracy.

Bhavani Ramasubbu
Group of people holding trophy that says "2018" Top 10 StickyMinds Articles of 2018

With the rise of technology like AI and practices like DevOps, teams everywhere are looking for ways to speed up testing without sacrificing quality. The articles in 2018 reflect that, with the most popular topics being shifting testing left, optimizing tests for continuous integration, and the future of software testing. If you're looking for cutting-edge testing techniques, check out this roundup.

Beth Romanik
Testers looking at graphs of performance test results Responsibly Reporting Performance Test Results: Trends, Noise, and Uncertainty

In order for performance test results to have value, you should report them in context. There are two main considerations: How do these compare to previous results? And how can we provide early reports on performance while emphasizing that these are preliminary results that may change significantly as we progress? Here are some ideas for responsible reporting.

Michael Stahl
Gauge with a needle in the green zone, showing good performance 7 Simple Tips for Better Performance Engineering

Rigorous practices to reinforce performance and resilience, and testing continuously for these aspects, are great ways to catch a problem before it starts. And as with many aspects of testing, the quality of the performance practice is much more important than the quantity of tests being executed. Here are seven simple tips to drive an efficient performance and resilience engineering practice.

Franck Jabbari
Graph showing how testing earlier costs less and means fewer overall defects The Shift-Left Approach to Software Testing

The earlier you find out about problems in your code, the less impact they have and the less it costs to remediate them. Therefore, it's helpful to move testing activities earlier in the software development lifecycle—shifting it left in the process timeline. This article explores the shift-left methodology and how you can approach shifting left in your organization.

Arthur Hicken
Decision table Using Decision Tables for Clear, Well-Designed Testing

Decision tables are used to test the interactions between combinations of conditions. They provide a clear method to verify testing of all pertinent combinations to ensure that all possible conditions, relationships, and constraints are handled by the software under test. If you need to make sure your test cases cover all outcomes in a scenario, read on to learn how to use decision tables.

Josh Giller
Dial with the needle moving from red to green A Better Way of Reporting Performance Test Results

Reporting the results of functional tests is relatively simple because these tests have a clear pass or fail outcome. Reporting the results of performance testing is much more nuanced, and there are many ways of displaying these values—but Michael Stahl felt none of these ways was particularly effective. He proposes a reporting method that makes performance test results easy to read at a glance.

Michael Stahl
Code on a computer screen Testing a Software Rewrite

Suppose we’re looking at a system rewrite where the stakeholders have none of the original engineering documentation. (This isn't surprising; documentation becomes obsolete—or even misleading—as the system changes, and corresponding docs don't get updated.) What can we do? Here are some tactics to use—and risks to anticipate—when testing a system rewrite.

Steve Poling
Cursor hovering over a question mark button Keeping Accessibility in Mind: Cognition, Memory, and Attention

Digital accessibility refers to assistive technologies as well as to accessibility of web and mobile applications and electronic documents. But there are crucial aspects to accessibility beyond syntactical correctness of the HTML code and supporting a range of browsers and devices. Software testers must have knowledge of accessibility patterns and use a variety of tools to understand the experiences of people with disabilities.

Albert Gareev

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