Test Design

Articles

Tester holding up a pair of eyeglasses Testing What You Can’t See: Risk Blindness in Coverage Models

The way we think about what necessitates test coverage being “complete” influences how we test and the cases we create. After all, you wouldn't design tests for situations that don't occur to you—and you can't test what you can't see. It's time to take off the blinders. Here's how you can find where the bugs in your products are occurring, and then adjust your strategy to pinpoint them.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Two paths going through the woods Taking the Negativity out of Negative Testing

Everyone on the software team has the same goal of delivering the best product they can, so letting testers discover bugs is always good—the more bugs found, the better! But misconceptions often lead to testers getting the bad rap of "breaking" the software. It's a tester's job to think like a user. Developers and stakeholders might call that negative testing, but the result is a better product, and that’s all positive. Let's change the way we talk about testing.

Jessica Lavoie's picture Jessica Lavoie
Close-up of computer keyboard Testing AI Systems: Not as Different as You’d Think

AI-based tools have transformed from a vague, futuristic vision into actual products that are used to make real-life decisions. Still, for most people, the inner workings of deep-learning systems remain a mystery. If you don’t know what exactly is going on while the input data is fed through layer after layer of a neural network, how are you supposed to test the validity of the output? It’s not magic; it’s just testing.

Kerstin Kohout's picture Kerstin Kohout
Person writing down rules for software testing in a notebook The Simple Rules of Software Testing

Simple rules are great for guiding us through an overwhelming workload. Sometimes complicated solutions are necessary, but simple rules often outperform complex algorithms, making them more efficient than sophisticated, difficult flows. They can also break down big goals into practical daily guidelines testers can follow to perform more effectively. Let’s see how simple rules can be applied in software testing.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Person comparing two apples An Automated Approach to Regression Testing

Testing every single thing isn't feasible, so regression testing should be holistic in verification while focused in scope. A good goal is to ensure no regression issue is introduced into a critical business flow. This endeavor can benefit from automation. An automated testing approach specific to reducing regression issues can go a long way toward building a good client relationship and high brand value.

Anubhav Bansal's picture Anubhav Bansal
Person using a screen reader Fitting Accessibility Testing into Agile Development

The concept of accessibility has been around for more than twenty years, yet it’s only recently that more companies have started including it in their development efforts. Developers and testers are recognizing the advantages of incorporating accessibility techniques into their processes. Here are some of these methods specific to agile software development, including a handy checklist.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
Person holding magnifying glass up to computer screen to find a bug 6 Ways Testers Can Add Value (Other Than Functional Testing)

Many testers spend their time doing functional testing and don't come out of this cocoon. But software testing is all about discovering quality-related information to assist stakeholders in making informed decisions, and there are multiple ways to discover information in addition to functional testing. Here are six actions that will help you add more value to your projects.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Michael Bolton Is All Testing Exploratory? A Slack Takeover with Michael Bolton

Thought leaders from the software community are taking over the TechWell Hub for a day to answer questions and engage in conversations. Michael Bolton, a speaker and thought leader in the testing industry, hosted this Slack takeover, which led to discussions about test exploration, tools, and testers as gatekeepers.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
A piece of plain paper laid over a pile of other paper with typed words Overcoming Challenges to Good Test Documentation

Getting good test documentation is a consistent challenge. Agile proposes that you should go very light on documentation, and while test documentation does not need to be heavy, it does need to be clear and cover all that the product is intended to do so you can ensure testing is consistent and results are recorded. Here's how to overcome some major barriers to getting good test documentation.

Steven Penella's picture Steven Penella
Red octagonal stop sign 3 Testing Practices We Should All Stop

Testing evolves, and it becomes clear that some concepts we’re all used to doing are no longer applicable today. It’s important to periodically take stock of our testing practices and cull the ones that no longer make sense—or are downright harmful. Here are three common testing practices it’s in our best interests to stop doing.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas

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