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Agile icon 5 Ways Agile Testing Is Different from Traditional Testing

It’s the distinctions between agile and traditional software development approaches, as well as the adaptability of testers in these very different environments, that makes agile testing different from traditional testing. Agile demands more from its testers, and, in turn, it values them more, too. Let’s look at five main things that make an agile tester’s life different from that of a traditional tester.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Job hunting Job Hunting for Software Testers: A Primer

As straightforward as most software testing and QA job postings seem, they may not actually tell you much about the job itself or the company that’s posting. How can you tell whether you’d be a good fit? If you are interested, how can you best approach the application process? László Szegedi's analysis will help you ask the right questions and prepare yourself to nail the interview.

Laszlo Szegedi's picture Laszlo Szegedi
Test automation frameworks Heresy! Automation Does Not Require Test Cases

Traditionally, automated scripts are derived from existing test cases. But if we divorce the notion of “automation” from the notions of “test cases” and “test scripts,” we can think of automation as a judicious use of technology to help humans do their jobs. This broadens our world to include different tools that can help testers increase coverage, test faster, and detect trends.

Paul Grizzaffi's picture Paul Grizzaffi
Matt Heusser Passing the Torch at StickyMinds

The StickyMinds technical editor for the last four years, Matt Heusser, is moving on from his post. Here, he reflects on what he learned working for StickyMinds and the experiences he had, and he introduces you to the new person who will take over for the site.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Shift right Testing the Unexpected: A Shift Right in DevOps Testing

When it comes to testing in DevOps, more than simple regression checking can be automated. By shifting right in the lifecycle and testing in production, you can analyze the undefined, unknown, and unexpected by relying on real traffic and unpredictable test input. With shorter implementation and release cycles, testing and production come closer together.

Stefan Friese's picture Stefan Friese
A webpage with accessible sections through headings Advocating for the User in Accessibility Testing

So much of accessibility testing seems subjective. (What exactly does “visible” mean?) This article uses real websites to demonstrate examples of good—and poor—accessibility. It’s up to the tester to advocate for users, so it’s essential to know what elements need to be checked and how to confirm that they are promoting accessibility.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
Test estimation Why Is Estimating Software Testing Time So Difficult?

Management loves to ask testers to estimate how long their efforts will take. But so many important aspects elude measurement that testing time is difficult to predict. Here are some of the major factors that significantly influence our ability to estimate testing time well, along with some advice on how you can tighten up your efforts.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Rope fraying Your Load Test Model Is Broken: How to Understand and Correct the Data

When conducting load testing, if all you do is run the same tests and then examine data such as average response time, you could be missing some red flags. Load test models usually aren't analogous to the real world, so you may have disappointed users you don't even know about. It's our responsibility to understand what our tools do as well as what the results mean.

Jeremy Carey-Dressler's picture Jeremy Carey-Dressler
You Can’t Buy DevOps

There are organizations that want to “buy DevOps,” like it is a plugin to add to the development process. They often create a new role, team, department, or infrastructure. But you can't buy DevOps, and it's not a designated team, either. It is the idea of people working together. Here are some approaches to get you there.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team Book Review: Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team

Jurgen Appelo’s useful and fun-to-read book Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team gives you concrete tools to identify ways to help your team be happier and to create environments where people can thrive and be more productive. Despite the word managing being in the title, the book is a beneficial read for anyone.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk


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