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Close-up of computer keyboard Testing AI Systems: Not as Different as You’d Think

AI-based tools have transformed from a vague, futuristic vision into actual products that are used to make real-life decisions. Still, for most people, the inner workings of deep-learning systems remain a mystery. If you don’t know what exactly is going on while the input data is fed through layer after layer of a neural network, how are you supposed to test the validity of the output? It’s not magic; it’s just testing.

Kerstin Kohout's picture Kerstin Kohout
Eyeglasses bringing data on a computer screen into focus Finding the Information inside Your Data

Data analysts have to know a lot about diverse business areas so that our reports provide usable information, not just data. We can use this awareness of the value of information to merge different data sets in order to answer new questions, and even help our users make better decisions. But in order to do this, we need to present not just the data, but the information value represented in that data.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Sign saying "Dead end" 6 Reasons Automation Projects Fail

No matter what the domain or company, there are some common problems that always tend to affect new automation projects. Here are six top reasons automation projects can fail. Keeping these pitfalls in mind will help you to avoid them and instead build stable automation frameworks, making the endeavor a collaborative experience so that your whole team owns automation.

Raj Subramanian's picture Raj Subramanian
Three cucumbers Why You Shouldn't Use Cucumber for API Testing

Many people misunderstand the purpose of Cucumber. Because it seems to yield clearer, plain-language test scripts, testers want to use Cucumber as a general-purpose testing tool, including for API tests. But its true purpose is as a BDD framework. You may be thinking, what’s the harm? Here’s why it makes a difference—and why you should choose another tool for API testing.

Byron Katz's picture Byron Katz
Person writing down rules for software testing in a notebook The Simple Rules of Software Testing

Simple rules are great for guiding us through an overwhelming workload. Sometimes complicated solutions are necessary, but simple rules often outperform complex algorithms, making them more efficient than sophisticated, difficult flows. They can also break down big goals into practical daily guidelines testers can follow to perform more effectively. Let’s see how simple rules can be applied in software testing.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Infinity symbol with test automation gear incorporated Test Everywhere: A Journey into DevOps and Continuous Testing

A move to DevOps creates an opportunity to shift the testing process to the left. But what if you went further? DevOps supports continuous testing, so you can advocate for a constant focus on quality, with testing permeating the entire software development process. Here's how you can actually have a faster testing process when the software is tested throughout the lifecycle, by developers, testers, and automation alike.

Glass bottlenecks Dealing with a Test Automation Bottleneck

The test team uses the test automation system to execute thousands of test cases because … why not? The tests are running automatically, for free, so there is no incentive to improve test efficiency. Just run them all! But eventually, as more and more tests are added, the system becomes overloaded. Test runs are delayed and you get a bottleneck. Don't throw more money—or new systems—at the problem; do this instead.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Person comparing two apples An Automated Approach to Regression Testing

Testing every single thing isn't feasible, so regression testing should be holistic in verification while focused in scope. A good goal is to ensure no regression issue is introduced into a critical business flow. This endeavor can benefit from automation. An automated testing approach specific to reducing regression issues can go a long way toward building a good client relationship and high brand value.

Anubhav Bansal's picture Anubhav Bansal
"Wrong Way" road sign To Get Quality Software, Let Them Fail

As an advocate for quality, you look at the product, take into account time, budget, and other business constraints, and recommend fixes to ship a product with the best possible quality. ... And the businesspeople in production don’t want to fix it. How can you communicate bugs and risk to people who don't want to listen? Instead of getting frustrated, you need to frame issues in a meaningful way—and, if you have to, let people fail.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Software engineer pouring coffee into a mug that says "UGH" 11 Reasons Behavior-Driven Development Can Fail

There are a lot of advantages to behavior-driven development, but there are also a lot of challenges you can encounter during the implementation. Knowing is half the battle, so be aware of these eleven common stumbling blocks to BDD adoption and outline plans to mitigate them beforehand, and you’ll be able to start reaping the benefits of BDD sooner.

Evgeny Tkachenko's picture Evgeny Tkachenko

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