Requirements

Articles

Requirements model Requirements Mapping Using Business Function Test Suites

On this team, testers were overcommitted, avoidable defects were surfacing, and documentation was hard to find. Worse, trust and morale were low. Upgrading tools was out of the question, so the testers decided to take matters into their own hands and create incremental change themselves. Here's how a team added a new type of traceability to its requirement test case world.

Balazs Schaffhauser
A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi
A line of identical rubber ducks The Unspoken Requirement: Testing for Consistency

It's easy to see that style consistency is important when discussing the user interface. But there are other areas where being consistent is just as important, even though they are not as visible. Consistency is one of the quality attributes of a product—any product—even if it is not stated clearly in the requirements documents, and testers have a responsibility to check for it.

Michael Stahl
Passing the baton Testing during Transition: Test Criteria for Outsourced Software

In the world of IT outsourcing, it is not uncommon for a company to have its applications and infrastructure developed or maintained by others. As vendors compete for this business, a common trial is testing the transition activity as a whole. How would you design acceptance criteria of a transition trial so that it is testable and clearly communicated?

Jesper Ottosen

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