Design & Develop

Articles

Continuous delivery Test Coverage in the Age of Continuous Delivery

Test coverage is a strategy to help us spend scarce testing time on the right priorities. When things were tested last, how much automation coverage we have, how often the customers use the feature, and how critical the feature is to application are all factors to consider. Here are some ideas for keeping quality high when you're transitioning to continuous delivery.

Matthew Heusser
Service virtualization Overcome Test Automation Plateaus with Service Virtualization

With complex enterprise test automation systems, at least some of the many required dependencies are commonly incomplete, unavailable, or operating incorrectly at the time of test execution. The result is timeouts, incomplete tests, false positives, and inaccurate results. Service virtualization can help you overcome this plateau and increase test automation rates.

Development, operations, and QA DevOps: Collaboration with a Purpose

Development, operations, and QA have long recognized the importance of coexistence, but they've still had weak or unbalanced relationships. DevOps emphasizes collaboration, rejecting the "us versus them" mentality. Every department needs information, feedback, and support from every other department, helping everyone see how they enable each other.

Douglas Fink
User analytics Focus Your Testing by Understanding How Customers Use Your Product

If you're uncertain about where to focus your testing or what kind of testing you should be doing, look at what your users are telling you. Understanding the analytics of how your customers use your application can help you improve your test efforts. This article explores instances of how this data can inform user interface automation, compatibility testing, and web services tests.

John Ruberto
Service virtualization containers Leverage Containers to Create Simulated Test Environments on Demand

Adopting service virtualization can allow organizations to achieve more effective software development and testing by removing traditional test environment bottlenecks. Integrating service virtualization within the continuous delivery pipeline using containerization helps teams reach the level of flexibility required by today's competitive markets.

Bas Dijkstra
Checkers game Teach DevOps Software Development with a Game

The core idea of DevOps is the various roles working together to create a stable software system. People can hear that, or read about it, or even observe it, but often, the best way for a team new to DevOps to understand it is to just do it. When you're starting out, that can lead to failures on a real system, so a simulation is a good idea. Try playing a game to introduce your team to DevOps.

Matthew Heusser
Shift right Testing the Unexpected: A Shift Right in DevOps Testing

When it comes to testing in DevOps, more than simple regression checking can be automated. By shifting right in the lifecycle and testing in production, you can analyze the undefined, unknown, and unexpected by relying on real traffic and unpredictable test input. With shorter implementation and release cycles, testing and production come closer together.

Stefan Friese
DevOps You Can’t Buy DevOps

There are organizations that want to “buy DevOps,” like it is a plugin to add to the development process. They often create a new role, team, department, or infrastructure. But you can't buy DevOps, and it's not a designated team, either. It is the idea of people working together. Here are some approaches to get you there.

Matthew Heusser
man looking at arrows DevOps: Changing the Software Testing Game

The DevOps movement promises to be as influential as project management and good requirements ever were in programming and testing. By combining ops (deploys, monitoring) with programming (automated builds, automated virtual servers) and testing (risk management), we get something that is more than the sum of its parts.

Matthew Heusser
stacked containers Containers: A Tester's Friend or Foe?

Containers support the timely delivery of a quality software application. However, the change to a DevOps process involving containers will require testers to adapt to this new, more agile environment. What does that mean for testers and the work they do? Here's how testers can embrace these changes, containers, and DevOps.

Kevin Dunne

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