test management

Articles

A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Two gears coming together Start Trusting Your Test Automation Again

The more you rely on feedback from your automated tests, the more you need to be able to rely on the quality and defect-detection power of these tests. Unfortunately, instead of being the stable and reliable guardians of application quality they should be, automated tests regularly are a source of deceit, frustration, and confusion. Here's how you can start trusting your automated tests again.

Bas Dijkstra's picture Bas Dijkstra
Mobile device lab Reduce Regression Issues by Establishing a Mobile Automation Lab

If you have a spotty test automation strategy, you may get lots of regression issues every time you have a new release for your mobile app. A mobile device lab to run regular regression tests could be the key. Here's a plan to get a mobile automation lab up and running, as well as some practices that can help reduce the number of regression issues and improve your overall app test strategy.

Saurabh  Arora's picture Saurabh Arora
Sisyphus pushing boulder up a hill Keep Technical Debt from Undermining Your Performance Testing

If you are unsure about the things you should be doing to control technical debt in your existing performance test suites, here are a few questions that should be considered. Asking yourself these questions regularly will go a long way toward keeping your tests fit and sustainable and helping control a few common factors that lead to technical debt in performance tests.

Andrei Sandu's picture Andrei Sandu Don Prather
A line of identical rubber ducks The Unspoken Requirement: Testing for Consistency

It's easy to see that style consistency is important when discussing the user interface. But there are other areas where being consistent is just as important, even though they are not as visible. Consistency is one of the quality attributes of a product—any product—even if it is not stated clearly in the requirements documents, and testers have a responsibility to check for it.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Legos 100 Percent Unit Test Coverage Is Not Enough

Many people equate 100 percent unit test coverage with high code quality, but that is not enough. Code coverage tools only measure whether the tests execute the code; they make no judgment on the effectiveness of the tests. Testers should review unit tests, even if they have high coverage levels, and either help improve the tests or supplement them with extra tests where necessary.

John Ruberto's picture John Ruberto
Continuous delivery Test Coverage in the Age of Continuous Delivery

Test coverage is a strategy to help us spend scarce testing time on the right priorities. When things were tested last, how much automation coverage we have, how often the customers use the feature, and how critical the feature is to application are all factors to consider. Here are some ideas for keeping quality high when you're transitioning to continuous delivery.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Problem-solving strategies Problem-Solving in Software Testing: A Conversation

How many times have you started to solve a particular problem and realized midway that the actual problem is not what you thought it was? Ajay Balamurugadas relates a conversation he had with a colleague in software testing about issues with test cases, and the lessons he learned from that problem-solving process. Here's what you should consider.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Leader Tester-Driven Unit Testing: Taking an Active Role

Developers have so much to do that unit tests often fall by the wayside. One solution is to train testers to handle them. Testers get involved earlier in the development lifecycle, they can enhance their programming skills, and bugs are found and fixed quickly and easily, reducing the functional testing phase. Consider taking an active role in unit testing.

man working with template TEMPLATE: Create a Comprehensive Test Strategy

Developing a coherent test strategy for a new software product or for major changes to an existing product can be challenging. This is especially true for the new test engineer for whom this template was developed. This template is a basic guide to help the user through the discovery thought processes necessary to create a sound test strategy for a project.

Craig Kam's picture Craig Kam

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