4 Steps to Level Up Your Testing Game and Advance Your Career

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Summary:

As more businesses are adopting DevOps and demanding continuous delivery, it's important for testers to constantly upgrade their skills. By leveraging the right resources, including developer and application performance management tools, you can play a bigger and more collaborative role in producing higher-quality output.

I started my career as a tester before I became a developer. It gave me the foundation to understand the intimate relationship between testing and developing new products. Like many aspects of IT, every step of production and deployment of products has become complex. But at the same time, many people have come to view testing itself as a commodity.

Don’t misinterpret what I am saying; testing is critical. But manual testing by itself can be done by almost anyone in the world; some labor is cheap, and crowdtesting services are making it easier for companies to outsource these tasks.

You need to up your game to provide critical value to your organization, including meeting the demand for comprehensive, rapid automated and continuous testing. Today’s businesses are adopting DevOps and continuous delivery and demanding more releases with higher quality (not just finding bugs in JIRA), so it's important for testers to constantly upgrade their skills.

With that in mind, here are four steps you can take to build your career and make yourself (and the test team) more valuable to your organization. By leveraging the right resources, including developer and application performance management (APM) tools, you can play a bigger and more collaborative role in producing higher-quality output.

Step 1: Make DevTools Your Friend

Many testers actually test websites. There are many key performance indicators here to consider, but one of particular importance to mobile sites is size.

My favorite example is Pepsi. Their mobile landing page for the 2014 Super Bowl forced my iPhone to download 434 images and 20 megabytes’ worth of content, which took about fifteen seconds. As you can see below, Pepsi’s current website is still rather heavy. Opening Chrome DevTools reveals some bad metrics: 433 roundtrips, 14.5MB in size, and many HTTP 403 errors.

Chrome DevTools reveals some bad metrics for Pepsi's site.

With the tools we have these days, there is no longer any excuse for an implementation like this to end up in deployment. Testers can level up their contributions by finding and offering solutions to situations like this, rather than simply creating bug reports.

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User Comments

1 comment
Ewelina Matalowska's picture

Great article about the importance of good communication between Developers and Testers and improvement of this relation will ensure a high quality testing process. 

July 5, 2016 - 4:49am

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