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Legos 100 Percent Unit Test Coverage Is Not Enough

Many people equate 100 percent unit test coverage with high code quality, but that is not enough. Code coverage tools only measure whether the tests execute the code; they make no judgment on the effectiveness of the tests. Testers should review unit tests, even if they have high coverage levels, and either help improve the tests or supplement them with extra tests where necessary.

John Ruberto
Smiling robot The Future of Software Testing

Many software testers have opinions about the future of their profession. Here, László Szegedi takes a look at how today's realities could shape tomorrow's possibilities for testers when it comes to new skills and technologies, roles and dynamics, and tools and devices. What could your job look like a decade or more from now?

László Szegedi
Extract, transform, load Testing the Extract, Transform, and Load Process in Data Warehouses

Pulling data from a source system and putting it into a data warehouse is a process commonly known as extract, transform, and load, or ETL. Testing the process can be a chore—you need to be sure all appropriate data is extracted, that it is transformed correctly to match the data warehouse schema, and that it's all imported. Instead of testing the ETL process as a black box, you can pull it apart, testing each piece in isolation.

Matthew Heusser
Taking notes next to computer How Testers Can Start Thinking like Users

When it comes to what testers should focus on, people always say you have to think like a user. Aleksis Tulonen used to think he was good at doing that—until he started actually sitting next to his applications' users. Then he thought of all kinds of questions that testers should consider more often. He discusses what you can learn from your users.

Aleksis Tulonen
Five pillars 5 Pillars of a Successful Test Automation Implementation

Discussions on what constitutes a “proper implementation” of test automation often focus on what tool you should use, but that is only one part of the equation. Bas Djikstra details four other things you should consider, how they contribute to the success of your test automation, and what risks are associated with failing to pay proper attention to each of them.

Bas Dijkstra
Green lightsaber Strategies for Testing a Lightsaber (That Don’t Include the Force)

In the Star Wars saga, those in tune with the Force wield lightsabers. Lightsabers are self-built, so each one is unique and a reflection of the personality of its creator. As a tester, I found it intriguing to think about how we would test lightsabers in our own galaxy. Let’s explore how the techniques we might use for testing lightsabers can inform our real-world testing.

Michael Mak
Passing the baton Testing during Transition: Test Criteria for Outsourced Software

In the world of IT outsourcing, it is not uncommon for a company to have its applications and infrastructure developed or maintained by others. As vendors compete for this business, a common trial is testing the transition activity as a whole. How would you design acceptance criteria of a transition trial so that it is testable and clearly communicated?

Jesper Ottosen
Continuous delivery Test Coverage in the Age of Continuous Delivery

Test coverage is a strategy to help us spend scarce testing time on the right priorities. When things were tested last, how much automation coverage we have, how often the customers use the feature, and how critical the feature is to application are all factors to consider. Here are some ideas for keeping quality high when you're transitioning to continuous delivery.

Matthew Heusser
Slot machine QA for Slot Machines: Testing Randomization, Winning Combinations, and Big Payouts

Considering their underlying technology, slot machines are intriguing test subjects. The software at the back end randomly generates the numbers and patterns of the winning combinations, and when you add currency processing into the mix, you have some interesting test cases. If you've ever wondered what goes into testing slot machines, read on.

Krishnan Govindarajan
Application logs Who’s Using Your App? Examine Logs for Testing Insight

When testing an application, have you ever thought to yourself, "I wonder who uses this"? Examining the app's logs can give you some idea. Logs are helpful for testers because they provide real feedback and insight into an application as it’s being used, as well as information that describes or can even help solve bugs. Here's how to use them to inform your testing.

Josh Grant

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