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Gold-plated leaves Build Just Enough of a Feature with ATDD

Developers have a tendency to overbuild their code. This is frequently due to not knowing exactly when they're done and not knowing how robust a feature needs to be. Acceptance test-driven development (ATDD) is a great way to avoid this practice because when the acceptance test passes, the developer knows they're done building that particular feature.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
Person holding a map A Beginner's Guide to Test Automation

If you’re new to automated testing, you’re probably starting off with a lot of questions: How do I know which tests to automate? Why is automated testing useful for me and my team? How do I choose a tool or framework? This article answers a lot of those questions—and gives you some more to consider!—so you have an excellent foundation for beginning your automation endeavors.

Angela Riggs's picture Angela Riggs
Michael Bolton Is All Testing Exploratory? A Slack Takeover with Michael Bolton

Thought leaders from the software community are taking over the TechWell Hub for a day to answer questions and engage in conversations. Michael Bolton, a speaker and thought leader in the testing industry, hosted this Slack takeover, which led to discussions about test exploration, tools, and testers as gatekeepers.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
A piece of plain paper laid over a pile of other paper with typed words Overcoming Challenges to Good Test Documentation

Getting good test documentation is a consistent challenge. Agile proposes that you should go very light on documentation, and while test documentation does not need to be heavy, it does need to be clear and cover all that the product is intended to do so you can ensure testing is consistent and results are recorded. Here's how to overcome some major barriers to getting good test documentation.

Steven Penella's picture Steven Penella
A tesselated pattern of gray tiles Test Tooling Patterns for Solving Problems

A design pattern consists of the pattern name, the problem it solves, how to implement the solution, and some consequences. There are also proven patterns like this that can be used in testing. This article lists and defines many commonly used patterns that can help you solve problems, improve code maintenance, and just make your life easier.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Graphic of test automation tools The TERMS for Test Automation Risk or Success

Automation is a service to testing—a tool that may prove to be useful or turn wasteful. When approaching test automation, there are five main areas to focus on, expressed in the acronym TERMS: Tools and Technology, Execution, Requirements, Maintenance, and Security. Here are some examples of how these factors are involved in defining automation success or failures.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
Red octagonal stop sign 3 Testing Practices We Should All Stop

Testing evolves, and it becomes clear that some concepts we’re all used to doing are no longer applicable today. It’s important to periodically take stock of our testing practices and cull the ones that no longer make sense—or are downright harmful. Here are three common testing practices it’s in our best interests to stop doing.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Test pyramid with the base unit test layer eroded The Eroding Agile Test Pyramid

The test pyramid is a great model for designing your test portfolio. However, the bottom tends to fall out when you shift from progression testing to regression testing. The tests start failing, eroding the number of working unit tests at the base of your pyramid. If you don't have the development resources required for continuous unit test maintenance, there are still things you can do.

Wolfgang Platz's picture Wolfgang Platz
Chefs preparing and cooking food Taste-Testing: Cooking Up Good Software

Think about what we do while cooking food to make it the best dish possible. We taste the food first, make necessary adjustments and add a few more ingredients, taste the food again, and repeat until the dish is how we want it. This is just like building a software product. If you don’t taste the food before serving it—or test the software before rolling it out—there will be a risk that the quality isn’t up to your standards.

Arun Kumar Dutta's picture Arun Kumar Dutta
Power button Simplify Continuous Operation Tests with a Periodic Reboot

Continuous operation tests find important bugs, partly as a result of their long operation and partly by increasing the probability of finding statistical bugs. However, CO tests have their own downsides. Mandating a periodic reset or reboot can work around these issues, as well as save time and cost for testing, reproduction, debugging, and fix verification.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl

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