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hands holding letter Dear Software Development Manager: A Letter from Your Testers

More and more, testers are being added to programming teams. We testers think that's great, and we're happy to be here. But we also have some concerns based on our interactions with development teams in the past. To make the transition easier, here's a letter pointing out some things you should know when managing testers on your development team.

Marcus Blankenship's picture Marcus Blankenship
string reminder around finger 4 Things to Remember to Ensure Good Test Coverage

When it comes to testing, there are so many areas that it's difficult to feel sure you covered everything. It can be helpful to use a mnemonic or other memory aid to remind you of your main points to hit. Terry Wiegmann recommends adding the acronym NEBS—for Normal, Error, Boundary, and Special test conditions—to your toolkit.

Terry Wiegmann's picture Terry Wiegmann
Genghis the robot Behavior-Based Test Automation and the Future of Software Engineering

Behavior-based robots are engineered to be mechanically reactive to input and gradually adapt their actions. What if we could apply this approach to an automated test harness? Are bots independently exploring an application under test and intelligent learning machines analyzing the results the future of software testing?

Martin Ivison's picture Martin Ivison
circle of continuous arrows Learn Agile Techniques to Become a More Valuable Tester

Agile is still on the rise, with many organizations that have been successful at the team level looking to scale their adoption. Consequently, it's important for testers to have practical application of agile techniques. You should know how to create tests to optimize maximum test coverage, have interpersonal skills, and successfully build relationships within the team.

Leanne Howard's picture Leanne Howard
availability percentage checklist Testing Strategies to Increase System Availability

The more critical a system is, the more highly available that system needs to be. However, it is very difficult—if not impossible—to measure every way a system can fail or to predict how long it will take to recover. But don’t worry! There are still many test strategies you can employ to understand your system’s failures, reduce downtime, and increase availability.

Andrei Sandu's picture Andrei Sandu Don Prather
embedded software Accountability in Testing Embedded and IoT Software Systems

Take a look at the critical systems in the world today and you’ll find software. From water, power, and utilities to nuclear plants, factories, and cars, pretty much everything has become integrated with digital devices and the internet. We need to do testing from a risk-based perspective and be accountable to the public by acknowledging what is tested and what is not.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
goldfish leaping from one fish bowl to another The Secret to Change Management: Creating a New Tradition

When we try to implement new processes, there is often resistance from the team. People get so used to their typical habits that it doesn't occur to them that there could be a better way to do things. To get buy-in from everyone, you need to understand the current traditions, then think about how you can set an example to start making the processes a new tradition.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
man guessing Don’t Guess Your Tests—Strive for Complete Requirements

Many teams struggle with test creation due to miscommunication or a lack of requirements, testers not being present during design phases or discussions, a shortage of time, or incomplete information. But that doesn’t mean you should turn to guesswork. Your tests will suffer in quality and completeness. We must always strive to get the desired requirements.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
compass Lessons Learned Navigating the Conflicting Schools of Software Testing

The testing community can be divisive. We all have various ideas about what we think is the best way to test. But it's important to get along with people who don’t hold opinions identical to yours—and maybe even participate in an exchange of ideas. One tester looks back on his early days and imparts some lessons he's learned navigating the different schools of software testing.

Antonio Gutierrez's picture Antonio Gutierrez
lock Using the Principles of the CIA Triad to Implement Software Security

If you're starting or improving a security program for your software, you probably have questions about the requirements that define security. Data need to be complete and trustworthy, and also accessible on demand, but only to the right people. The CIA triad defines three principles—confidentiality, integrity, and availability—that help you focus on the right security priorities.

Sylvia Killinen's picture Sylvia Killinen

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