Test Planning

Articles

Person looking at an app on multiple devices 3 Strategies for an Efficient Mobile App Testing Project

Developing a testing strategy for a mobile app means facing multiple challenges that are part of the field. But by employing these three strategies, you can get valuable feedback about your mobile app’s functionalities before it is published—while still keeping time and budget in mind.

Thomas Raynott's picture Thomas Raynott
Tweezers plucking a password out of code Conducting Security Testing for Web Applications

As cyber attacks continue to create panic, the threat to our applications and data in the digital sphere grows stronger. Enterprises in the connected world need to realize that security testing is essential for their web applications. They need modern, all-inclusive security testing plans from the inception of their projects to ensure a secure user experience. Here's how to get started.

Ketan Sirigiri's picture Ketan Sirigiri
Icon showing one end to another Endgame Testing: Exploring Your Agile Product End to End

The main goal of endgame testing is to test the system end to end from the user's perspective. This should ensure continuity between components developed by different teams, continuity in user experience, and successful integration of new features. Endgame testing will often identify gaps that are difficult to discover inside agile teams, including flows across the product.

Doron Bar's picture Doron Bar
A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Two gears coming together Start Trusting Your Test Automation Again

The more you rely on feedback from your automated tests, the more you need to be able to rely on the quality and defect-detection power of these tests. Unfortunately, instead of being the stable and reliable guardians of application quality they should be, automated tests regularly are a source of deceit, frustration, and confusion. Here's how you can start trusting your automated tests again.

Bas Dijkstra's picture Bas Dijkstra
Mobile device lab Reduce Regression Issues by Establishing a Mobile Automation Lab

If you have a spotty test automation strategy, you may get lots of regression issues every time you have a new release for your mobile app. A mobile device lab to run regular regression tests could be the key. Here's a plan to get a mobile automation lab up and running, as well as some practices that can help reduce the number of regression issues and improve your overall app test strategy.

Saurabh  Arora's picture Saurabh Arora
Sisyphus pushing boulder up a hill Keep Technical Debt from Undermining Your Performance Testing

If you are unsure about the things you should be doing to control technical debt in your existing performance test suites, here are a few questions that should be considered. Asking yourself these questions regularly will go a long way toward keeping your tests fit and sustainable and helping control a few common factors that lead to technical debt in performance tests.

Andrei Sandu's picture Andrei Sandu Don Prather
A line of identical rubber ducks The Unspoken Requirement: Testing for Consistency

It's easy to see that style consistency is important when discussing the user interface. But there are other areas where being consistent is just as important, even though they are not as visible. Consistency is one of the quality attributes of a product—any product—even if it is not stated clearly in the requirements documents, and testers have a responsibility to check for it.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Legos 100 Percent Unit Test Coverage Is Not Enough

Many people equate 100 percent unit test coverage with high code quality, but that is not enough. Code coverage tools only measure whether the tests execute the code; they make no judgment on the effectiveness of the tests. Testers should review unit tests, even if they have high coverage levels, and either help improve the tests or supplement them with extra tests where necessary.

John Ruberto's picture John Ruberto
Extract, transform, load Testing the Extract, Transform, and Load Process in Data Warehouses

Pulling data from a source system and putting it into a data warehouse is a process commonly known as extract, transform, and load, or ETL. Testing the process can be a chore—you need to be sure all appropriate data is extracted, that it is transformed correctly to match the data warehouse schema, and that it's all imported. Instead of testing the ETL process as a black box, you can pull it apart, testing each piece in isolation.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser

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