Test Planning

Articles

Icon of a dial showing good system performance Measuring the Performance of Your Operations Center

Many organizations have problems with consistently tracking and measuring system outages. Issues aren't logged, admins make changes to systems without going through change management, and a high number of issues turn out to be recurring problems. Implementing a performance measurement process calculates system reliability and can help you improve consistency.

Nels Hoenig
Clip art of an insect with a target on its back How Much of Debugging Software Is a Tester’s Responsibility?

Everyone knows a tester's job is to help improve the quality of the software under test. But it gets a little murky when you try to define the boundary between testing and debugging. There's no clear delineation: Some testers would state how to reproduce the bug, write the report, and hand it off, while others learn the code, find the root cause, and even create builds to fix the bugs. How much is useful, and how much is too much?

Michael Stahl
Puzzle pieces being put together to spell "Usability" Testing to the Usability Standards Our Customers Expect

Allowing minor defects to be included in releases impacts our customers’ perspective on software professionalism. We’ll never catch every weird, obscure bug, but there are some design elements where they tend to lurk. By focusing our testing efforts on these areas—or at least not neglecting them—we can catch more issues before our customers do.

Nels Hoenig
Desktop with CRM software dashboards Lessons Learned in Testing CRM Software

CRM systems manage a company’s business relationships, including customers’ data, information, and interactions, so there’s a lot that can—and should—be tested. Viktar Sachuk talks about his experience in testing CRMs to provide some tips for dealing with the trickiest parts of CRM testing, specifically focusing on some preparatory measures, functional testing, integration testing, and test automation.

Viktar Sachuk
Hand drawing automation gears For Sustainable Test Automation, Look beyond the Surface

When it comes to achieving sustainable test automation, having an appropriate test automation team structure in place is the most important first step to take. This article has some proven practices for a few different test automation adoption scenarios—led by an automation team or a regression team, and with agile adaptations—that have helped organizations enjoy long-term test automation success.

Maximilian Bauer
Monitoring dashboard with criteria set up Solving Production Issues Using Testing Tools

Standard web-monitoring tools can ping webpages and verify that they’re responding, but they don’t alert you to an issue. But you can use the technology in load testing to monitor your sites by running an interactive script that can detect issues and generate emails as needed. It runs constantly like a silent sentry, never sleeping or taking a vacation, improving your sites' reliability.

Nels Hoenig
Two golden retrievers lying on the floor, photo by Gulyás Bianka The Who, What, When, and How of Pair Testing

Pair testing can help you speed up your test assignment and provide more quality to your test results. But who can do pair testing, and when should they do it? And what kind of pair testing is best for your situation? This article gives you more information about how you should conduct pair testing in order to maximize its benefits.

Simon Schrijver
Graphic of gears Complex, Critical Software System Testing: When Automation Is the Only Option

While some testers are unfamiliar with test execution automation, the growing trend into automation necessitates new skills for manual testers. Project test teams need to become aware of this trend, as automation represents not only business opportunities, but also increased quality and fewer risks in complex, safety-critical, and mission-dependent projects.

Jon Hagar
Identical bugs under a magnifying glass When Testers Should Consider a Bug a Duplicate

When can a bug report be considered redundant because it is already reported in the bug management system? If you ask the developers, if two bugs are caused by the same mistake in the code, it’s enough to report one of them. But Michael Stahl has good arguments from a tester's perspective about why it's better to err on the side of over-reporting bugs.

Michael Stahl
Path breaking away from a road Learn More from Tests That Stray off the Happy Path

Unit tests exercise various paths through your codebase. Some are happy paths where everything you expect goes right. These tests are boring. The interesting tests are the ones where your code goes hurtling off the happy path. The trick is to capture the diversity of a multitude of unhappy paths without needlessly duplicating unit tests. Here's how you can improve the quality of your unit testing and fix it more effectively.

Steve Poling

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