Test Design

Articles

Bug taxonomy Using Bug Taxonomy to Design Better Software Tests

In software testing, bug taxonomy involves defining feature categories and collecting lists of possible bugs in each category. These lists can be used to give inexperienced testers some starting points, to help experienced testers brainstorm new ideas, and to evaluate the completeness of a test case. Using an existing bug taxonomy can be useful, but creating your own is even better.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Metrics dashboard on a tablet For Great Performance, Rethink Your Load Testing

The word concurrency is often used to define workload for load testing, as in concurrent users. Too often, it's the only input defined. In reality, there are a number of factors that contribute to workload and affect concurrency, and they all contribute to your load testing abilities—and, ultimately, the performance of your product.

Tim Koopmans's picture Tim Koopmans
Person looking at an app on multiple devices 3 Strategies for an Efficient Mobile App Testing Project

Developing a testing strategy for a mobile app means facing multiple challenges that are part of the field. But by employing these three strategies, you can get valuable feedback about your mobile app’s functionalities before it is published—while still keeping time and budget in mind.

Thomas Raynott's picture Thomas Raynott
Tweezers plucking a password out of code Conducting Security Testing for Web Applications

As cyber attacks continue to create panic, the threat to our applications and data in the digital sphere grows stronger. Enterprises in the connected world need to realize that security testing is essential for their web applications. They need modern, all-inclusive security testing plans from the inception of their projects to ensure a secure user experience. Here's how to get started.

Ketan Sirigiri's picture Ketan Sirigiri
Icon showing one end to another Endgame Testing: Exploring Your Agile Product End to End

The main goal of endgame testing is to test the system end to end from the user's perspective. This should ensure continuity between components developed by different teams, continuity in user experience, and successful integration of new features. Endgame testing will often identify gaps that are difficult to discover inside agile teams, including flows across the product.

Doron Bar's picture Doron Bar
A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Infinity symbol Has Continuous Deployment Become a New Worst Practice?

Software development has been moving toward progressively smaller and faster development cycles, and continuous integration and continuous deployment are compressing delivery times even further. But is this actually good for businesses or their users? Just because you can deploy to production quickly and frequently, should you?

John Tyson's picture John Tyson
Digital wrench and gears Methods and Tools for Data-Driven API Testing

Data-driven API testing can enable feedback much sooner and more often during development while being just as comprehensive as classic functional black-box testing. There are many methods of API testing, but that shouldn't intimidate you. Testers looking to advance their careers should consider learning some coding in order to test their programs at the API level.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
A touchscreen with connected IoT devices IoT Security Should Start with the UI Setup

IoT security is a large and changing topic, but there is one basic starting point where device security can be improved during development and testing: the user interface. The UI should be the first line of defense, but it’s currently weak in most IoT devices. Implementing better practices during the initial UI setup will go a long way toward improving security.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Touchscreen phone with handset Test Techniques for Today’s Telephones

Telephones look very different today from when they were first invented, and their many capabilities and components make for some interesting test cases. Krishnan Govindarajan details his team's recent experience testing a phone, including its splitter, cloud backup, voicemail and answering machine, and VoIP, and gives some techniques to use when testing modern telephones.

Krishnan Govindarajan's picture Krishnan Govindarajan

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