Test Design

Articles

Load Testing with Real-World Modeling

If you want to get an accurate idea of how your Web site is going to perform in the real world, it pays to create a load profile that closely models conditions your site will experience. This article addresses nine elements that can affect Web load.

Steve Splaine
The 11th Hour

Testers are often on the critical path for getting a software release out. They must plan carefully in order to minimize the critical path, while still doing a complete job of testing. This schedule pressure is taken to an extreme when a production server must be taken offline in order to deploy the software, and everyone is waiting for the final test results before the system can go live again. Karen Johnson describes her company's carefully planned and orchestrated method for doing a final check of an installed system. Her story is relevant to e-commerce companies as well as IT shops that are under pressure to keep systems updated while minimizing downtime.

Karen N. Johnson's picture Karen N. Johnson
Five Ways to Think about Black Box Testing

Have you ever seen a software testing discussion erupt into a debate over the definition of black box testing, or the difference between black box and white box testing? It seems lots of people have lots of ideas about what the terms really mean. Columnist Bret Pettichord uses the five dimensions of testing to examine black box and white box testing. And he leaves you with a few puzzles to consider.

Bret Pettichord's picture Bret Pettichord
Stateful Web System How to Test Cookies in a Stateful Web System

The protocol used for exchanging files on the Web is stateless, but maintaining state is essential for most Web sites. To maintain state, one option that Web developers have is to use cookies. So what happens when you delete a cookie in the middle of an e-commerce site? Rich Brauchle provides a technical background and real-world examples to help you understand how cookies work and how to test systems that employ cookies; and has some fun along the way.

Richard Brauchle
Software Test Design Specification IEEE 829-1998 Format (template)

This Software Test Design Specification template is based on the IEEE 829-1998 test standard and additional information added from various sources—actual test plans, instructor experience, student comments, etc.

Wayne Middleton's picture Wayne Middleton
Software Test Case Specification IEEE 829-1998 Format (template)

This Software Test Case Specification template is based on the IEEE 829-1998 test standard and additional information added from various sources—actual test plans, instructor experience, student comments, etc.

Wayne Middleton's picture Wayne Middleton
Software Test Procedure Specification IEEE 829-1998 Format (template)

This Software Test Procedure Specification template is based on the IEEE 829-1998 test standard and additional information added from various sources—actual test plans, instructor experience, student comments, etc.

Wayne Middleton's picture Wayne Middleton
Internet Accessibility

Ever try to navigate the Web with your eyes closed? Without a mouse? Fifty million Americans are differently-abled, and nearly half of these people encounter difficulties accessing the World Wide Web. The U.S. government recently took steps to tackle the accessibility issue. Here's some coverage of the issue.

Brian Globerman
The Wonderful World of Software

Former STQE magazine Technical Editor Brian Lawrence shares a tale about why a commitment to quality and paying close attention to detail are critical elements in building better software. It's all about careful planning and anticipating customer behavior. Go with Brian on a stroll through one of the oldest, best-known amusement parks to find out more.

Brian Lawrence
Making Sure You Buy the Right Packaged-Software Solution

The slick brochure promises every feature you can imagine, and the sales rep assures you that his package will do just what your users want. But that's what the other vendor's sales rep said, too. Sound familiar? Karl Wiegers recommends several requirements development practices that can help you select the right commercial package solution. Key practices include identifying user classes, defining their use cases, creating test cases from the high-priority use cases, documenting pertinent business rules, and exploring the users' performance goals and other quality attributes.

Karl E. Wiegers

Pages

StickyMinds is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.