Test Design

Articles

the UML for class diagrams Class Diagrams

This is the third in a series of articles written to a) introduce you to the most important diagrams used in object-oriented development (use case diagrams, sequence diagrams, class diagrams, and state-transition diagrams); b) describe the UML notation used for these diagrams; and c) give you as a tester a set of practical questions you can ask to evaluate the quality of these object-oriented diagrams.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
example of the matrix for test cases Streamlining the Test Process

When building large test suites, one problem that crops up is test case redundancy. Test suites are especially vulnerable to this when many members of the test team are writing test cases. The likelihood of one engineer writing test cases that are somewhat covered by another engineer's is very high. This results in duplication of effort when executing the tests. I will present some strategies for avoiding this problem when constructing the test suite, as well as methods for maximizing efficiency with your test suite.

Andrew Lance
Brewing Trouble

Admit it: When you're faced with a lengthy checklist for testing, you're tempted to skip steps. Some of the items aren't really necessary, are they? They might be so obvious that there's no need to include them in the list. In this column, Elisabeth Hendrickson offers some advice on constructing useful checklists that are brief but complete.

Elisabeth Hendrickson's picture Elisabeth Hendrickson
Automated Testability Tips

Imagine a world where applications are written with automated testing in mind. Fantasy? Before you dismiss the idea, read this column. Linda Hayes makes some simple suggestions for designing for testability, including using unique names and adhering to class consistency.

Linda Hayes's picture Linda Hayes
post implementation problem reports Eliminating Functional Defects Through Model-Based Testing

Model-based testing is based on the premise that lowering costs and improving software reliability require a tight link between functional specifications and test cases. The test process should find problems in the specification of requirements and guarantee that the functionality called out in the specification is completely exercised during the testing effort. If testers can develop full-coverage test scripts directly from quality specifications, they can be highly confident that the functionality has been successfully translated into the delivered applications.

Peter Becker
UML notation for sequence diagrams Sequence Diagrams

This is the second in a series of articles written to a) introduce you to the most important diagrams used in object-oriented development (use case diagrams, sequence diagrams, class diagrams, and state-transition diagrams); b) describe the UML notation used for these diagrams; and c) give you as a tester a set of practical questions you can ask to evaluate the quality of these object-oriented diagrams.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
a timeline for pervasive testing Maximum ROI through Pervasive Testing

Pervasive testing means getting the right people working together through the right processes at the right time for high-ROI testing. Through pervasive testing, all the ideas we've explored so far come together.Web site (as of late-July 2002).

 

Rex Black's picture Rex Black
The Importance of the Using Right Test Techniques

The choice of the right test techniques is critical to achieving a good return on the test investment. Some tests happen before we can even run the software. Some tests involve analyzing the structure of the system, while others involve analyzing the system's behavior. Each technique can involve special skills and particular participants, and might appropriately entail the use of tools-or not.

Rex Black's picture Rex Black
Modeling Practice and Requirements

Models are useful in different settings in different ways. Models can test facts, ideas and understanding, simulate operation, and aid coordination between systems and people. In this column, Becky Winant lists six model patterns she has seen in practice in software development organizations, talking about where each is appropriate, and the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Becky Winant
An informal Quality Risk Analysis for a Hypothetical Word Processor Key Risks to System Quality

Before we can build a high-fidelity test system, we have to understand what quality means to our customers. Test professionals can avail themselves of three powerful techniques for analyzing risks to system quality. Targeting our testing investment by increasing effort for those areas most at risk results in the highest return on investment.

Rex Black's picture Rex Black

Pages

StickyMinds is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.