QA

Articles

As Test Automation Matures, So Do False Positives

In life and in test automation, a lot of things change as you mature—the challenges you face, the types of failures you experience, and the best ways to solve them. Let’s skip the “life lessons” and focus on the test automation angle here

Wolfgang Platz's picture Wolfgang Platz
Most Common QA Myths

One of my mentors, whom I admire, once told me, "Quality is not only QA's responsibility; everyone- from development engineers to technical architects, to product managers need to share the responsibilities. In a QA role, if you want to be successful, you have to know the right amount of information from everyone and always ask questions." I took my mentor's advice very seriously. 

Dilruba Malik's picture Dilruba Malik
Computer showing fire on the screen Strengthening System Resilience with Chaos Engineering

Testing continuous technological change can seem like chaos. There are many challenges that need to be managed, such as unavailability of power, excessive temperature, incorrect configuration, unexpected behavior of services, network downtime, and processing slowdown in production. By deliberately engineering chaos, we’ll be able to discover many of our systems’ weaknesses before our users do.

Hand placing block in row of blocks with left arrows Fitting In Regression Testing by Shifting QA Left

Fixing a bug in one area of the software may break something in another area. To detect whether defects have been introduced, we need to perform regression testing—executing certain test cases again to see whether a change has affected other existing features. But how do you make time for another testing cycle prior to every production release? You need to get QA involved earlier in the software development lifecycle.

Shuja Naqvi's picture Shuja Naqvi
Tester and developer shaking hands across a table How to Collaborate on a Brand-New QA Team

As a quality analyst, when you raise a bug, developers sometimes react as if you were personally attacking their job. The situation can be even more difficult if you are starting a new QA team, where you will work with people who have never had the quality assurance component. Here is some advice for ways you can be effective when you’re starting on a team that has never worked with quality analysts before.

Juan Pablo Aguirre's picture Juan Pablo Aguirre
QA professionals performing continuous testing How Continuous Testing Is Done in DevOps

DevOps does speed up your processes and make them more efficient, but companies must focus on quality as well as speed. QA should not live outside the DevOps environment; it should be a fundamental part. If your DevOps ambitions have started with only the development and operations teams, it’s not too late to loop in testing. You must integrate QA into the lifecycle in order to truly achieve DevOps benefits.

Junaid Ahmed's picture Junaid Ahmed
Woman wearing a hard hat and working with a machine Blending Machine Learning and Hands-on Testing

As your QA team grows, manual testing can lose the ability to focus on likely problem areas and instead turn into an inefficient checkbox process. Using machine learning can bring back the insights of a small team of experienced testers. By defining certain scenarios, machine learning can determine the probability that a change has a serious defect, so you can evaluate risk and know where to focus your efforts.

James Farrier's picture James Farrier
Cursor hovering over the word "Security" on a computer screen Integrating Security and Testing Practices

QA and information security use different methods to approach the same goals. When both groups work together, they can make a greater impact on the security of our products. Here's how the QA team can collaborate with infosec to implement strong security standards, prioritize what to test, and obtain quicker feedback on processes, ultimately seeing fewer production incidents related to security.

Sylvia Killinen's picture Sylvia Killinen
Score being shown at a baseball game More Than a Score: Taking a Deeper Dive into Your Metrics

One key benefit of metrics is that they can be measured using a standard process; we can explain the numbers, and leadership can understand what that means. The downside is that it is only a measurement, so issues can easily hide until they become problems, and great work can also go unrepresented. Sporting events are a great example: The end score tells you who won, but not the details of the game. We need to look deeper.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Team members fitting puzzle pieces together Whole-Team Testing for Whole-Team Quality

Whole-team testing means the whole team understands and participates in testing, using testing education as a tool to support quality efforts. And to be able to support testing in a meaningful way, team members must experience how testing is done by professional testers. Understanding skilled testing can help non-testers realize what quality criteria should be there and what elements of a product contribute to great quality.

Lalit Bhamare's picture Lalit Bhamare

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