Project Management

Conference Presentations

eXtreme Programming: Managing Agile Development

Extreme Programming (XP) has captured the attention of the industry by challenging many cherished beliefs held about software development and management. Not only that, it's actually delivered against those challenges. As a development process, XP focuses on producing sound software architectures while delivering required functionality to customers on time and within budget. It uses iterative development along with other controversial yet effective techniques to get the job done. Robert Martin gives us the real scoop on why XP has enjoyed so many successes, and how it can and will continue to flourish in business development environments.

Robert Martin, Object Mentor, Inc.
Mentors, Models, and the Making of Managers: Special Panel Discussion

Each of us has a story about how we came to be managers in software organizations. Many of us became managers because we were good developers. Some of us studied management in school. A few of us were groomed and mentored by the companies we work for, and some were tapped for management because we were the only warm body available. But now that we're here, what does it take to become an effective manager? Is being mentored and developed as a manager considered a luxury? Join this interactive panel and discuss the real-life issues and challenges of developing ourselves-and others-as software managers.

Moderator: Esther Derby ( Esther Derby Associates, Inc.)
Read My Lips: No New Models!

These days, it seems everyone who wants to make a mark in the software world feels the need to invent a new model or methodology. While such models provide useful frameworks for structuring our thinking and practices, enough already! Karl Wiegers contends we don't need any more new and improved models for software engineering. Rather, we need to encourage a majority of developers to consistently and effectively apply the practices that have already been shown to work.

Karl Wiegers, Process Impact
Speaking to Your Management: What Do You Do When They Do Not Listen

This presentation explains some of the language barriers and experience barriers between management and quality assurance professionals.

Ed Weller, Software Technology Transition
Software Improvement Feedback Loops: How to Develop a Learning Organization

Over the past twenty-five years, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) at NASA/GSFC has studied mechanisms for improving the software process and product. During this time, a set of processes has evolved: the Goal/Question/Metric Paradigm; the Quality Improvement Paradigm; and the Experience Factory Organization. These processes are based on the needs for measurement and feedback loops, from project to process and project to project, creating a learning organization for building software competencies. In this presentation, Victor Basili discusses these processes, how they evolved, the lessons learned, and the effects of their application in the SEL.

Victor Basili, Software Engineering Laboratory
Thinking About People, Process, and Product: A Principle that Works at Work

All projects involve the three P's: people, process, and product. People includes everyone who influences the project. Process is the steps taken to produce and maintain software. Product is the final outcome of the project. To keep these three in harmony, you must observe who is trying to do what to deliver what. Usually, two of the three P's are mandated, and the third one is chosen appropriately. Although this is common sense, it is not common practice. Dwayne Phillips discusses the issues and challenges that affect us all on every project. Learn about the ideas and questions to consider to help you work through these issues.

Dwayne Phillips, U.S. Department of Defense
A Practical Framework for Software Measurement

Measurement is often defined in terms of collecting data, distinguishing it from analysis-the interpretation and use of data. Clearly, the collection of data must be driven by its intended use. In this presentation, David Card presents a framework that treats measurement and analysis as an integrated process. Discover the four basic components of this framework, and learn how to use the framework to ensure that all-important perspectives and potential users of measurement are considered in the measurement planning process.

David Card, Software Productivity Consortium
A Force for Change-Using Resistance Positively

When we try to improve our organizations, we inevitably encounter resistance. This presentation describes how to turn resistance into a resource. Whatever else it may be, resistance is information about the people we are asking to change; about the environment in which the change will happen; about the changes we recommend; and ultimately, about ourselves. Learn ways to tap into that information to turn resistance into a resource for creating lasting improvement.

Dale Emery, Sun Microsystems
Launching a Web Development Team

Based on a real-life case study, learn how one Fortune 500 manufacturing company-with four development groups in two locations-created a flexible and cost-efficient Web development solution to meet the needs of an expanding business. Explore the development problems-and solutions-encountered on a project of this scope, including issues with geographically dispersed development.

Thomas Vlasic, John Deere Co.
Organization: The Forgotten Dimension

Explore the software project manager's actual, perceived, and desired position in an organization. Learn how the differences in these three views-coupled with the understanding of roles, responsibility, authority, and accountability-may be more important to a manager's success than the method used to manage the project. Discover techniques that leverage "difficult" organizational structures and cultures to enable the free flow of information that is critical to process improvement and project performance.

Mark Servello, Change Bridge, Inc.

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