Project Management

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A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
A line of identical rubber ducks The Unspoken Requirement: Testing for Consistency

It's easy to see that style consistency is important when discussing the user interface. But there are other areas where being consistent is just as important, even though they are not as visible. Consistency is one of the quality attributes of a product—any product—even if it is not stated clearly in the requirements documents, and testers have a responsibility to check for it.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Passing the baton Testing during Transition: Test Criteria for Outsourced Software

In the world of IT outsourcing, it is not uncommon for a company to have its applications and infrastructure developed or maintained by others. As vendors compete for this business, a common trial is testing the transition activity as a whole. How would you design acceptance criteria of a transition trial so that it is testable and clearly communicated?

Jesper Ottosen's picture Jesper Ottosen
Continuous delivery Test Coverage in the Age of Continuous Delivery

Test coverage is a strategy to help us spend scarce testing time on the right priorities. When things were tested last, how much automation coverage we have, how often the customers use the feature, and how critical the feature is to application are all factors to consider. Here are some ideas for keeping quality high when you're transitioning to continuous delivery.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Application logs Who’s Using Your App? Examine Logs for Testing Insight

When testing an application, have you ever thought to yourself, "I wonder who uses this"? Examining the app's logs can give you some idea. Logs are helpful for testers because they provide real feedback and insight into an application as it’s being used, as well as information that describes or can even help solve bugs. Here's how to use them to inform your testing.

Josh Grant's picture Josh Grant
Great job interview How to Ace Your Next QA Job Interview

The secret to acing your next job QA interview is mastering what to say when the interviewer asks you to tell them a little about yourself. Preparation is key, so here are three important points to hit, as well as some sample scripts to modify for your own history, so that you can go into your next QA job interview with complete confidence.

Tim Ebie's picture Tim Ebie
Problem-solving strategies Problem-Solving in Software Testing: A Conversation

How many times have you started to solve a particular problem and realized midway that the actual problem is not what you thought it was? Ajay Balamurugadas relates a conversation he had with a colleague in software testing about issues with test cases, and the lessons he learned from that problem-solving process. Here's what you should consider.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Encouraging growth Agile Managers: Trust Your Team and Encourage Innovation

In order to fully embrace agile and create an environment where individuals want to work together as a team, managers have to move from a role of dictation to one of direction and mentorship. Instead of making all the decisions, managers need to trust their team members and empower them to solve problems on their own, innovate, and fail—or succeed.

Lisa Rich's picture Lisa Rich Mic Riley
Leader Tester-Driven Unit Testing: Taking an Active Role

Developers have so much to do that unit tests often fall by the wayside. One solution is to train testers to handle them. Testers get involved earlier in the development lifecycle, they can enhance their programming skills, and bugs are found and fixed quickly and easily, reducing the functional testing phase. Consider taking an active role in unit testing.

The Agile Manifesto Let the Agile Manifesto Guide Your Software Testing

Although its values are commonly associated with agile software development, the Agile Manifesto applies to all people and teams following the agile mindset, including testers. This article examines the four main values of the Agile Manifesto and reveals how they can bring agility to test efforts—improving quality for your team and your customers.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg

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