Project Management

Articles

Hand drawing automation gears For Sustainable Test Automation, Look beyond the Surface

When it comes to achieving sustainable test automation, having an appropriate test automation team structure in place is the most important first step to take. This article has some proven practices for a few different test automation adoption scenarios—led by an automation team or a regression team, and with agile adaptations—that have helped organizations enjoy long-term test automation success.

Maximilian Bauer
Two golden retrievers lying on the floor, photo by Gulyás Bianka The Who, What, When, and How of Pair Testing

Pair testing can help you speed up your test assignment and provide more quality to your test results. But who can do pair testing, and when should they do it? And what kind of pair testing is best for your situation? This article gives you more information about how you should conduct pair testing in order to maximize its benefits.

Simon Schrijver
telescope Agile Trends to Watch in 2018

With 2018 well underway, it seems like a good time to look ahead and think about what we hope to accomplish this year. Find out which agile trends these software experts are most looking forward to in the coming months.

Heather Shanholtzer
A pair of rubber ducks The Many Advantages of Pair Testing

Pair testing can be done with various disciplines within the software development lifecycle. It has many advantages, both for the quality of the product and the benefit of the testers, and it doesn’t require any special training. You only need two brains and two pairs of eyes. Would your team try pair testing?

Simon Schrijver
Requirements model Requirements Mapping Using Business Function Test Suites

On this team, testers were overcommitted, avoidable defects were surfacing, and documentation was hard to find. Worse, trust and morale were low. Upgrading tools was out of the question, so the testers decided to take matters into their own hands and create incremental change themselves. Here's how a team added a new type of traceability to its requirement test case world.

Balazs Schaffhauser
Monster mask Tame Your Monster and Make Better Decisions

When you go into a meeting, lead a project, or have to ask management for something, remember that body language, tone of voice, and facial expression are part of the package. The techniques and words are just the tip of the iceberg; under the water are motivations, fear, and anger. If you're feeling anxious or uncertain, wait until you have good energy to make a decision.

Matthew Heusser
AngularJS logo Lessons Learned Testing Angular Applications

AngularJS is a framework used for organization of JavaScript code in highly interactive web and mobile applications. What does that mean from a testing perspective? Here's what should be in your test strategy when you’re testing Angular applications, including what might give you difficulty and how you can mitigate challenges.

Albert Gareev
Image of lock over code DevSecOps: Incorporate Security into DevOps to Reduce Software Risk

DevSecOps is a growing movement to incorporate security into DevOps practices in order to ensure flaws and weaknesses are exposed early on through monitoring, assessment, and analysis, so remediation can be implemented far earlier than traditional efforts. By failing fast with security testing, organizations reduce risk of a security incident and decrease the cost of rework.

Alan Crouch
Testing code Hybrid Verification: Mixing Formal Methods and Testing

The ability to verify contracts either statically or dynamically, coupled with recent advances in proof technology, has opened up a new and promising approach to verification. Critical code can be proved with formal methods, and less critical code can be verified using traditional testing, with a clear separation at the interfaces between the two.

Ben Brosgol
A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi

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