Process

Articles

Performance Tester Avoid Becoming a Lonely Cowboy Performance Tester

In the Wild West movies, the cowboys do not typically have a lot of friends; they follow no rules but their own, and their way of settling an issue is by shooting each other. In the wild world of software performance testing, without the support from people around and above you, it will be impossible to get anything done. You don’t have to be a lonely cowboy.

Jun Zhuang's picture Jun Zhuang
Testing Economics Testing Economics

Everything we do has an economic impact because what we do has costs and benefits. Testing is about getting real feedback quickly, reducing wasteful testing activities, and putting a mirror in front of our applications. It becomes advantageous to understand the costs of these activities and direct the effort investment where it’s most beneficial.

Gil Zilberfeld's picture Gil Zilberfeld
Looking for Bugs When Looking for Bugs, Look beyond the Software

A tester's job is to provide information about elements of the system that might make a user unhappy. But Jon Hagar finds that many testers implement limited tours, even when they have robust programs. He writes that when looking for bugs, testers need to look beyond the software to the system and the user scenarios, too.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Drive Your Testing Coverage Using Business Decisions to Drive Your Testing Coverage

In a business setting, software testers have a great challenge: to articulate how they support the business lines. One way to approach this is by addressing the business decisions—and there are plenty around. Use them to drive your testing activities and increase the business decisions being covered by testing.

Jesper Ottosen's picture Jesper Ottosen
Death Star Testing The Star Wars Death Star—from a Tester’s Perspective

In the movie Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope, the Death Star was designed to be the perfect weapon, with enough firepower to destroy a thousand star systems. Yet a small, ragtag group was able to blow it up. If only Emperor Palpatine had consulted with testers, all of the Death Star’s vulnerabilities could have been found and addressed!

Michael Mak's picture Michael Mak
Code Coverage Is Code Coverage a Silver Bullet?

While code coverage is a good number to look at in terms of reach achieved in a testing cycle, is it foolproof? Is this metric a silver bullet for understanding the team’s coverage and vouching for testing scope? In short, no. But it is a vital step on the way to solving your testing coverage issues.

Mukesh Sharma's picture Mukesh Sharma
Testers in an Agile Environment The Role of Testers in an Agile Environment

There are many diverse ideas about what being a tester means in agile development environments. This leads to confusion between how agile testers and agile QA “fit” into agile teams and what the QA tester responsibilities are. John Stevenson explains why there appears to be some fear and a little distrust of agile environments among some testers, then offers suggestions for dealing with their confusion.

John Stevenson's picture John Stevenson
Risk Identification Awareness of Risk Identification in Software Testing

When testing software, most of us identify risk seemingly effortlessly. But do we really understand the process we’ve undertaken? Do we know what methods we’ve called upon? Are we aware of how we’re identifying risks? And therefore, are we identifying all the important risks? David Greenlees uses models to assess these questions.

David Greenlees's picture David Greenlees
World for Software Testers A Dystopian World for Software Testers

You've entered the Twilight Zone. A robot that uses the cloud and massive amounts of big data can completely test software programs while detecting all bugs, rendering testers obsolete. But wait—the robot in this dystopian tale isn't utilizing special abilities only it can possess; these are methods any skilled tester should be employing right now.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Exploratory Testing Thoughts about Scripted and Exploratory Testing

Scripted and exploratory testing can be seen as opposites, and it’s true that they approach testing from different angles. But they can also support each other. It is more important to think about what we will achieve with certain levels of scripting or exploration. Ask yourself: What is controlling you when you perform a test?

Aleksis Tulonen's picture Aleksis Tulonen

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