Process

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Removing Test from Automation Removing the Word “Test” from Test Automation

It's not uncommon for organizations to use automation on a few projects and then realize automation is a lot of work. They want to get more out of the automation tool investment but with less development cost. By removing the word test from test automation, you liberate yourself to use the automation tool set in new and innovative ways.

Greg Paskal's picture Greg Paskal
Better Testing Tips Imagine an Ocean Between You: Tips for Better Testing

Is the best way to interact with your team in person, with your teammates right next to you? Not necessarily. By working online with remote programmers and testers, people tend to approach problems from some unique perspectives. Read on to learn how imagining an ocean between you and your teammates can actually improve your communication and process.

Michael Larsen's picture Michael Larsen
Spiral of an Organization Avoiding the Organizational Death Spiral

The death spiral supersedes the death march in that the death march is a singular event, whereas the death spiral is systemic. It is the result of organizational dysfunction where teams march toward deadline after deadline without reflecting on or questioning if there is a better way to deliver software. There is! Take these positive steps.

Thomas Wessel's picture Thomas Wessel
Testing Value Considering the Value of Software Testers

Many people think software testing is just about verifying from a checklist that functions do or do not appear. But what if more testers spent time looking at the product's behavior? Testers working with product owners, a development team, and other stakeholders can compare their understanding of the software and ask the crucial question, “Will this meet our needs?”

Peter Walen's picture Peter Walen
Continuous Delivery in Apps Database Continuous Delivery Meets Your Application

Continuous delivery meshes well with agile development: Both facilitate the need to move quicker and deal with ever-changing requirements, delivering the best quality possible but usually with not enough resources. Agility is what is expected from technology companies and IT divisions. So, what does it take to have continuous delivery in your database?

Uri  Margalit's picture Uri Margalit
Test Attacks to Break Mobile Devices Book Review: Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices

Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices presents an attack basis for testing mobile and embedded systems. Designed for testers working in the ever-expanding world of "smart" devices driven by software, the book focuses on attack-based testing that can be used by individuals and teams.

Michael Sowers's picture Michael Sowers
Testing Your Apps Picture Imperfect: Methods for Testing How Your App Handles Images

On a website and in digital files, images present a set of complications and differentiations that you need to keep in mind when your application receives and presents them. Your application might rely on a library, plugin, or service built somewhere else to handle this image management, so you should test the image uploader to ensure it works correctly and handles common points of failure. Here are some things to watch out for.

Brian Noggle's picture Brian Noggle
Automation is Not God Automation Test Suites Are Not God!

In today’s age of tight deadlines and accelerating delivery cycles of software, test automation is surely favorable for the world of functional testing and critical to the success of big software development companies. But its various benefits have led to unrealistic expectations from managers and organizations. This article highlights the role and use of automation in an agile context and the irreplaceable importance of manual testing.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Requirements for Testing 3 Types of Requirements for Testing

Requirements for software are usually grouped into a bewildering array of categories. Functional and nonfunctional requirements are on top, and a huge number of subcategories are underneath. Here, Clint Hoagland boils it down to three categories, differentiated by the way they should be tested.

Clint Hoagland's picture Clint Hoagland
Testers Quality Standards When Testers Should Stand Up and Say No

Testers often find themselves in predicaments where they may be asked to compromise on quality standards—whether it's pressure to sign off on a product before it's ready, getting involved in numbers games that value metrics above all else, or facing harassment to take on work that isn't theirs. Knowing when, how, and why to say no can improve your situation and gain respect for testers everywhere.

Mukesh Sharma's picture Mukesh Sharma

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