Analysis

Articles

Woman holding a magnifying glass to her eye Become a Data Detective

Rapid changes in data availability and analysis tools are leading to evolving expectations for the data analyst role. We can do much more than just generate reports; we have the opportunity to not only process data, but convert it into understandable information and use the knowledge revealed by our work to help change happen.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Desktop computer with monitoring software on the screen, photo by Jakob Owens 7 Ways Monitoring Can Help You Be a Better Tester

Monitoring makes your testing work easier, helps you manage certain biases you may have, and lets you learn a lot about the product, users, and even your own processes. Here are seven concrete benefits testers get from monitored data that you can use to convince your team to implement monitoring—as well as realize for yourself.

Lina Zubyte's picture Lina Zubyte
Dashboard on a computer showing test data results, photo by Carlos Muza Reporting Automated Test Results Effectively

The modern iterative software development lifecycle has developers checking in code to version control systems frequently, with continuous integration handling building and running automated tests at an almost equally fast rate. This can generate an enormous amount of test data. Here’s how you can ensure you are reporting results effectively across your team and realizing all the benefits of that information.

Ajeet Dhaliwal's picture Ajeet Dhaliwal
Man in a suit reading the Business section of a newspaper Getting Started with Business Intelligence Testing

There’s a bit of hype in terms such as business intelligence, data analytics, and data mining. In testing terms, though, it means working with scripts and databases, often without traditional GUI interaction. But core testing skills—analysis, synthesis, modeling, observation, and risk assessment—will still help you go far in business intelligence testing.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
Testing code Hybrid Verification: Mixing Formal Methods and Testing

The ability to verify contracts either statically or dynamically, coupled with recent advances in proof technology, has opened up a new and promising approach to verification. Critical code can be proved with formal methods, and less critical code can be verified using traditional testing, with a clear separation at the interfaces between the two.

Ben Brosgol's picture Ben Brosgol
Application logs Who’s Using Your App? Examine Logs for Testing Insight

When testing an application, have you ever thought to yourself, "I wonder who uses this"? Examining the app's logs can give you some idea. Logs are helpful for testers because they provide real feedback and insight into an application as it’s being used, as well as information that describes or can even help solve bugs. Here's how to use them to inform your testing.

Josh Grant's picture Josh Grant
computer connected to everything IoT, Mobile, and Tech Curve Disillusionment: Moving beyond the Hype

The hype around the Internet of Things is at its peak. Should you bother learning the skills developers and testers require in this new field, or will it soon become just another trend that's fallen out of favor? Jon Hagar makes a strong case for why the IoT will be relevant even after the clamor dies down, and why its associated skills will serve you well no matter what.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Big data Big Data’s Relationship with Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing

You’ve probably heard the buzz about big data and business intelligence data warehouses. Both deal with collecting information for analysis, but how are they different? When should you use one or the other? This article explains these two data solutions in a user-friendly way with real-world examples.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Clock: adding value How Testers Can Add Value Earlier in the Development Lifecycle

Before you can achieve continuous delivery, you need to first start implementing continuous integration. Some say CI is just for developers, but testers also play their own important roles. This article describes solutions that will help you add value to the development lifecycle—whether you work in an agile, DevOps, or traditional context.

Antoin Boerboom's picture Antoin Boerboom
Help keyboard button Overcoming Cognitive Friction to Engineer Better Software

The problems customers face are difficult to anticipate while developing software. However, looking at support issues can give a clearer idea about how to look for defects in the future. Sometimes users don’t know how to find certain information; other times, software doesn’t work as expected. In both cases, cognitive friction is at play.

Nilanjan Bhattacharya's picture Nilanjan Bhattacharya

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