Agile

Articles

Using Containers for Continuous Deployment Using Containers for Continuous Deployment

Pini Reznik explains how containers can help shorten the software development feedback loop by drastically reducing the overhead involved in deploying new software environments. This leads to faster build and test executions and simplifies the standardization of the development and production environments, allowing for an easier transition to continuous deployment.

Pini Reznik's picture Pini Reznik
Myth 27: We Can Take Hiring Shortcuts Management Myth 27: We Can Take Hiring Shortcuts

Hiring is difficult to do well, Johanna Rothman writes in her latest management myth piece. Because everyone who is looking to hire has a job, they think they know how to hire. But it’s not easy. You want to hire the best people you can who fit the team and the organization.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
 Assumptions to Model Value (or Not) Using Goals, Objectives, and Assumptions to Model Value (or Not)

Kent McDonald writes that identifying objectives and the assumptions underlying them provides you a way to measure whether the result of your project will actually get you closer to what you are trying to accomplish, as well as the impact your various assumptions have on reaching that objective. 

Kent J. McDonald's picture Kent J. McDonald
Using Agile for Requirements Management Using Agile for Requirements Management

Charuta Phansalkar writes on the necessity of capturing and understanding requirements using agile practices. Agile, when implemented effectively, will ensure that the customer's voice is clearly understood throughout the project, which results in maximum customer satisfaction.

Charuta Phansalkar's picture Charuta Phansalkar
Test Managers Survival Guide to Going Agile The Test Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile

Joel Bancroft-Connors presents a survival guide for testers going to agile. Joel explains what happened when he had to make the switch from waterfall to agile. Welcome to the world of being an agile manager, in which your team is a top performer, doing more in the same amount of time as before.

Joel Bancroft-Connors's picture Joel Bancroft-Connors
Pervasive Leadership Can Help You Manage Successful Projects How Pervasive Leadership Can Help You Manage Successful Projects

Jean Richardson shares a story about how the idea of pervasive leadership can help you manage a successful project. In order to practice pervasive leadership, one must change one's mental model of "I" and "thou," act locally and think holistically, and enact empathetic stewardship.

Jean Richardson's picture Jean Richardson
Myth 26: It’s Fine to Micromanage Management Myth 26: It’s Fine to Micromanage

Johanna Rothman explains the challenges and pitfalls of micromanagement. Sometimes, managers micromanage when they need information. In that case, it’s easier to create an information radiator rather than have the manager come running to you every thirty minutes.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Designing Scenarios for Agile Stories Designing Scenarios for Agile Stories

The needs to improve the time to market of a quality product and adapt to a changing business environment are driving organizations to adopt agile practices in order to be competitive in the marketplace. However, a project team is bound to face difficulties if it is not trained on the fundamentals of agile. Read on to learn how to design scenarios for agile stories using a structured framework.

Sharath Bhat's picture Sharath Bhat
Have You Used Word’s "Smell-Check" Features? Have You Used Word’s "Smell-Check" Features?

Terry Wiegmann writes about how Microsoft Word's features, like its spelling and grammar checkers, can help one identify agile smells—those signs that something might be wrong. While we may want to minimize documentation and the use of Word, we can mentally use some of Word’s features to sniff out some whiffs of smells.

Terry Wiegmann's picture Terry Wiegmann
Internationalization Best Practices for Agile Internationalization Best Practices for Agile Teams

Marcia Rose Sweezey and Stefan Visuri explain two best practices that are defined for agile teams in their organization. Read on to discover how externalizing strings and conducting pseudo-language testing during each iteration and sprint will give you the most payback for the least investment.

Marcia Sweezey's picture Marcia Sweezey Stefan Visuri

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