communication

Articles

Developers and testers giving each other useful feedback Improve Tester-Developer Relationships with Helpful Feedback

Testers and developers often have a strained relationship. Each side has a certain level of expectations as to what the other side should know and do, while there is little understanding of the constraints, conditions, and requirements that the other team has to work within. But it does not have to be this way. A little effort in giving more specific and helpful feedback can go a long way toward improving attitudes.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Testing team standing around a computer and smiling 3 Methods for Better Communication and More Effective Testing

Successful delivery of software requires the entire team, so it’s imperative that everyone choose their words carefully so they convey what they really mean, are sensitive to others’ feelings, and consider all aspects of a problem. Here are three questions to remember when communicating about your software testing projects to ensure you’re considering the power of words.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Hand holding black rotary telephone When DevOps Gets Lost in Translation

The waterfall method of developing software is a bunch of translation activities: The design is a translation of the requirements into the language of architecture, the code is another, and a formal test process is a third. And with each translation, there’s the opportunity to introduce error. When your DevOps team is isolated, it creates another handoff, and another point of failure.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
labels Semantics and the Risk of Labels in Software Testing

All industries have their own jargon practitioners use to communicate. Software testing surely has terminology most testers are familiar with and use to label artifacts frequently involved in their work. The problem becomes when testers hold too tightly to these labels, forgetting that the things they signify are what truly matters. It's important to remain flexible.

Jeremy Carey-Dressler's picture Jeremy Carey-Dressler

Interviews

Marcia Buzzella Improving Communication and Social Skills: An Interview with Marcia Buzzella
Video

Marcia Buzzella, an independent leadership consultant and strengths coach, discusses the importance of communication and social skills in a business atmosphere. She offers advice on tools to recognize your weaknesses in those areas and how to work toward improving your effectiveness.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Marcia Buzzella Why Testers, Developers, and Managers Need Better Communication: An Interview with Marcia Buzzella
Video

In this interview, Marcia Buzzella, a leadership consultant and strengths coach, explains how each member of a software development team can better communicate with one another, and why testers need to understand how what they’re saying is being perceived.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Jess Agile Improv Agile, Improv, and Learning How to Fail: An Interview with Jessie Shternshus
Podcast

In this interview, Jessie Shternshus, the owner and founder of The Improv Effect, explains the similarities between agile development and improvisation. She details how, in both cases, team members need to learn how to support each other, build on work, and be comfortable with failure.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin
Janet Gregory Key Skills Modern Testers Need: An Interview with Janet Gregory

In this interview, Janet Gregory, an agile testing coach and process consultant with DragonFire, explains what skills testers need to succeed in today's industry. She talks about how the testing role has changed, what communication skills testers need, and the importance of trying new things.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin

Conference Presentations

Capturing Testing with 3 Magic Words
Slideshow

Testers tend to be innately curious creatures. Being curious and evaluating risks—that is what the testing job is about. Often it is the statement “I don’t know” that drives our curiosity in testing. We don’t really know if it’s a good “I don’t know” or a bad “I don’t know” until we start communicating with others. Part of being a great tester is becoming comfortable with saying “I don’t know” and explaining what that means so that people remain confident in you. Join Janna Loeffler as she talks about when it is okay to say “I don’t know," when it’s not okay to say “I don’t know,” and how to best say it so that it's useful. Learn how to help others understand what your “I don’t know” means or doesn’t mean, and find out for yourself not only how to push past the fear of not knowing, but how to embrace your curiosity.

Janna Loeffler
Getting Your Message Across: Communication Skills for Testers
Slideshow

Communication is at the heart of our profession. No matter how advanced our testing capabilities are, if we can’t convey our concerns in ways that connect with key members of the project team, our contribution is likely to be ignored. Because we act solely in an advisory capacity, rather...

Thomas McCoy, Australian Department of Social Services

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