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Gil Sever Making Visual Testing Visually Perfect: An Interview with Gil Sever[interview]

Gil Sever, CEO at Applitools, discusses his journey in visual testing to making your product “visually perfect.” He talks about how companies are getting started in using automation, as well as how to get involved in leveraging and implementing AI in visual testing.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Eran Kinsbruner Moving to Progressive Web Development: An Interview with Eran Kinsbruner[interview]

Eran Kinsbruner, mobile evangelist at Perfecto, discusses his new book and how to be successful in continuous and web testing. He talks about the importance of moving from responsive to progressive web development and taking it to the next level. Eran also shares his insights on AI and machine learning and the element of trust involved with each.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Three cucumbers Why You Shouldn't Use Cucumber for API Testing[article]

Many people misunderstand the purpose of Cucumber. Because it seems to yield clearer, plain-language test scripts, testers want to use Cucumber as a general-purpose testing tool, including for API tests. But its true purpose is as a BDD framework. You may be thinking, what’s the harm? Here’s why it makes a difference—and why you should choose another tool for API testing.

Byron Katz's picture Byron Katz
Paul Grizzaffi Nontraditional Automation Using Fuzzy Browser Testing: An Interview with Paul Grizzaffi[interview]

Paul Grizzaffi, Principal Automation Architect at Magenic, discusses nontraditional automation using fuzzy browser testing and the importance of the value stream analysis from idea to implementation. He also shares his insight on the most critical skills needed in automation.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Person writing down rules for software testing in a notebook The Simple Rules of Software Testing[article]

Simple rules are great for guiding us through an overwhelming workload. Sometimes complicated solutions are necessary, but simple rules often outperform complex algorithms, making them more efficient than sophisticated, difficult flows. They can also break down big goals into practical daily guidelines testers can follow to perform more effectively. Let’s see how simple rules can be applied in software testing.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Jeremias Rößler Bringing AI into Testing: An Interview with Jeremias Rößler [interview]
Video

Jeremias Rößler, founder of ReTest, discusses his company’s open source re-check tool, how customer input was vital to the tool’s development, and shares  insight on growing a start-up. Jeremias also provides resources for learning about AI that can guide you on how to apply AI into your testing strategy.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Infinity symbol with test automation gear incorporated Test Everywhere: A Journey into DevOps and Continuous Testing[article]

A move to DevOps creates an opportunity to shift the testing process to the left. But what if you went further? DevOps supports continuous testing, so you can advocate for a constant focus on quality, with testing permeating the entire software development process. Here's how you can actually have a faster testing process when the software is tested throughout the lifecycle, by developers, testers, and automation alike.

Utilizing Containers to Improve Your Production Outcomes: An Interview with Melissa Benua[interview]
Video

Melissa Benua, engineering manager at mParticle, discusses the role that containers play in test environments. She answers questions like: Why do you need containers? How is your team going to benefit from containers? What is the first step in getting started with containers? Melissa provides resources for learning how to make a container and on how containers will aid you in maintaining control over data and code.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
Glass bottlenecks Dealing with a Test Automation Bottleneck[article]

The test team uses the test automation system to execute thousands of test cases because … why not? The tests are running automatically, for free, so there is no incentive to improve test efficiency. Just run them all! But eventually, as more and more tests are added, the system becomes overloaded. Test runs are delayed and you get a bottleneck. Don't throw more money—or new systems—at the problem; do this instead.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Jason Arbon Will AI and Machine Learning Take Over Software Testing?: An Interview with Jason Arbon[interview]

Jason Arbon, CEO and founder of test.ai, discusses his goal to test all the world’s apps. Jason also provides insight on a frequent question he faces: When will AI replace my job? He believes that AI and machine learning have already started taking over some aspects of software testing, and that this transition will keep accelerating. Based on available data, Jason predicts which aspects of testing are going to be subsumed by AI, in what order, and in what time frame.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Matt Grasberger Prioritizing Security Testing: An Interview with Matt Grasberger[interview]
Video

Matt Grasberger, a software consultant with Coveros, talks about how security testing is often put off in the development lifecycle until risks are so embedded that it’s a massive undertaking to fix them. Matt highlights two tools that can be used to automate security testing early in the development lifecycle and gives some resources for requirements that you should have as a baseline for your security testing.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Person comparing two apples An Automated Approach to Regression Testing[article]

Testing every single thing isn't feasible, so regression testing should be holistic in verification while focused in scope. A good goal is to ensure no regression issue is introduced into a critical business flow. This endeavor can benefit from automation. An automated testing approach specific to reducing regression issues can go a long way toward building a good client relationship and high brand value.

Anubhav Bansal's picture Anubhav Bansal
"Wrong Way" road sign To Get Quality Software, Let Them Fail[article]

As an advocate for quality, you look at the product, take into account time, budget, and other business constraints, and recommend fixes to ship a product with the best possible quality. ... And the businesspeople in production don’t want to fix it. How can you communicate bugs and risk to people who don't want to listen? Instead of getting frustrated, you need to frame issues in a meaningful way—and, if you have to, let people fail.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Privacy in a Time of Rich Telemetry[presentation]
Slideshow

Most modern testing, especially in a DevOps model, uses a lot of telemetry to evaluate and monitor quality of experience for apps and services. In this interconnected world, there is power and risk in data.

Ken Johnston
Software engineer pouring coffee into a mug that says "UGH" 11 Reasons Behavior-Driven Development Can Fail[article]

There are a lot of advantages to behavior-driven development, but there are also a lot of challenges you can encounter during the implementation. Knowing is half the battle, so be aware of these eleven common stumbling blocks to BDD adoption and outline plans to mitigate them beforehand, and you’ll be able to start reaping the benefits of BDD sooner.

Evgeny Tkachenko's picture Evgeny Tkachenko

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