personal improvement

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Testers in an Agile Environment The Role of Testers in an Agile Environment

There are many diverse ideas about what being a tester means in agile development environments. This leads to confusion between how agile testers and agile QA “fit” into agile teams and what the QA tester responsibilities are. John Stevenson explains why there appears to be some fear and a little distrust of agile environments among some testers, then offers suggestions for dealing with their confusion.

John Stevenson's picture John Stevenson
World for Software Testers A Dystopian World for Software Testers

You've entered the Twilight Zone. A robot that uses the cloud and massive amounts of big data can completely test software programs while detecting all bugs, rendering testers obsolete. But wait—the robot in this dystopian tale isn't utilizing special abilities only it can possess; these are methods any skilled tester should be employing right now.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Better Testing Tips Imagine an Ocean Between You: Tips for Better Testing

Is the best way to interact with your team in person, with your teammates right next to you? Not necessarily. By working online with remote programmers and testers, people tend to approach problems from some unique perspectives. Read on to learn how imagining an ocean between you and your teammates can actually improve your communication and process.

Michael Larsen's picture Michael Larsen
Thirty Days as Test Lead My First Thirty Days as a Test Lead: Expectations and Reality

Justin Rohrman took on a new role in his career: test lead. He wrote down his observations about the first thirty days in this position, recording what really happened when he changed jobs, what challenges he encountered with his new team, and how he and his coworkers resolved problems. His synopsis could be useful to any project team.

Justin Rohrman's picture Justin Rohrman
Making Difficult Choices Myth 31: I Don’t Have to Make the Difficult Choices

"Don't bring me problems; bring me solutions." Sound familiar? Sounds like a management cop out to Johanna Rothman. A primary purpose of managers is to help their teams perform to the best of their abilities, and that includes stepping up and making tough decisions to help solve problems.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Testers Quality Standards When Testers Should Stand Up and Say No

Testers often find themselves in predicaments where they may be asked to compromise on quality standards—whether it's pressure to sign off on a product before it's ready, getting involved in numbers games that value metrics above all else, or facing harassment to take on work that isn't theirs. Knowing when, how, and why to say no can improve your situation and gain respect for testers everywhere.

Mukesh Sharma's picture Mukesh Sharma
Planning During a Health Care Crisis Save Your Sanity: Planning During a Health Care Crisis

A health care crisis can hit without warning, leaving you both nursing the patient and mired in seemingly endless bureaucracy. In this article, Kathy Iberle shares with us her experience dealing with an elderly uncle who suffered a stroke and how agile methods, like using a visual planning board, can help one prepare and be ready when disaster strikes.

Kathy Iberle
Myth 27: We Can Take Hiring Shortcuts Management Myth 27: We Can Take Hiring Shortcuts

Hiring is difficult to do well, Johanna Rothman writes in her latest management myth piece. Because everyone who is looking to hire has a job, they think they know how to hire. But it’s not easy. You want to hire the best people you can who fit the team and the organization.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
The Three Pillars of Positive Psychology The Three Pillars of Positive Psychology

Positive psychology encourages positive and effective behaviors that help to bring out desired traits, and it applies well to many business and technical situations. Leslie Sachs explains the third pillar of positive psychology, which is related to organizational psychology and is of great interest to anyone who wants to be part of an effective institution.

Leslie  Sachs's picture Leslie Sachs
Myth 24: People Don’t Need External Credit Management Myth 24: People Don’t Need External Credit

When you’re the manager, always make sure you know who performed the work, and make sure other people know, too. People want to know you appreciate them. They want to know you are willing to carry that appreciation up the corporate ladder. More importantly, they want to know you are not a jerk who will take credit for the work they perform.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman

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