personal improvement

Conference Presentations

Introducing Personal Software Process--A Few (Un)Expected Lessons

Learn how one company successfully implemented SEI-PSP to a significant part of its software engineering organization. Key discussion points include organization readiness, a training approach, lessons learned, and ways to successfully introduce PSP into an organization. Discover the three process areas (inspections, planning, and quality) where PSP can have a significant impact.

Robert Galen, Wavetek Wandel Goltermann
Tracking Severity: Assessing and Classifying the Impact of Issues (a.k.a. Defects)

How does one categorize Severity? Should you use numbers like 1, 2, 3; generic names like High, Medium, Low; or more specific names? A telephone switching system, for example, might use industry-specific categories such as "system issue," "line issue," or "call issue." Other environments, as we'll see in this article, tailor classification terms to meet their own functional needs.

Tim Dyes
The Impact of Team/Personal Software Processes

Several years ago, the Naval Oceanographic Office initiated its process improvement effort with Team Software Process (TSP) and Personal Software Process (PSP) as its foundation. Learn about the areas in which TSP/PSP made a significant impact on implementing change relating to the organization's CMM maturity level. Discover how the structure provided by TSP/PSP facilitated the implementation of a Quality Assurance program, and explore the major impact TSP/PSP had on the organization's ability to establish a baseline of historical project data.

Edward Battle, Naval Oceanographic Office
How to Make Risk Conversations More Effective

Project managers may be reluctant, even unwilling, to discuss problems that testers discover in a project. In this column, management expert Johanna Rothman gives tips on how best to tell management that "the sky is falling," and how to respond if they don't want to hear about potential problems before they occur.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Advice on How to Hire Testers

What's the best way to wade through those thousands of resumes you've received for the new testing position? To start, you could ruthlessly weed out those who don't show experience with your organization's particular toolset. But in this column, Johanna Rothman warns against this type of approach to hiring. By not looking at the person beyond the tools, you might be letting a star slip through your fingers.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
A Child's-Eye View of Software Testing

You've had to explain and justify your job to Management, to Human Resources, and to everyone at your high school reunion. But now comes the ultimate test: Your child's assignment for the next show-and-tell is to describe what her mom or dad does for a living. You scramble for an easy way to explain—maybe for the first time—what you do at the office, but your software testing reference books just don't have enough pictures of cute animals to really do the trick. This book might be just what you're looking for.

Alyn Wambeke

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