bugs

Articles

Bug taxonomy Using Bug Taxonomy to Design Better Software Tests

In software testing, bug taxonomy involves defining feature categories and collecting lists of possible bugs in each category. These lists can be used to give inexperienced testers some starting points, to help experienced testers brainstorm new ideas, and to evaluate the completeness of a test case. Using an existing bug taxonomy can be useful, but creating your own is even better.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Bug Tracker Clean Up Your Bug Tracker and Keep Numbers Manageable

A good team likely is trained to consistently report defects as accurately and promptly as possible. This means that over time the bug backlog builds up, and looking for what bugs to fix starts to seem like searching for a needle in a haystack. The best way to keep your tracker under control is to improve the quality curve earlier.

Timothy Western's picture Timothy Western
Crowdsourced Testing Using Your Own Crowd for Crowdsourced Testing

A company used crowdsourced testing as part of the testing process when redesigning its website. This testing employed internal resources to achieve the benefits of crowdsourced testing at a greatly reduced cost and provided the added benefit of getting company employees used to the new site. Read on for a review of the process.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Better Bug Reports Building Better Bug Reports

Each bug report is colored by the judgment of the person producing it. Testers should want to develop their skills to be better communicators with bug backlog stakeholders so that an issue can be solved in a way that benefits everyone. Read on to challenge your ideas of what builds a clear, concise, contextualized—but still courteous—bug report.

Claire Moss's picture Claire Moss
FAQ: What Should I Do When My Bug Gets Rejected?

In this installment of FAQ, SQE Trainer Dawn Haynes answers one of the questions students ask her most often.

Dawn Haynes's picture Dawn Haynes
The One That Got Away

Many testers have been involved in post-ship decisions about bugs that “got away” – bugs that escaped testing and found their way into customer’s hands. Often, these post-mortem discussions end up with finger pointing and threats, but with the right focus, these discussions are a wonderful opportunity for learning and growth.

Alan Page's picture Alan Page
I'm Tired of Finding Bugs

After thirteen years as a tester, Alan Page is tired of finding bugs. While he still enjoys testing, he'd rather the bugs be prevented altogether. Read his article to find out how increase quality and decrease bugs earlier in the cycle.

Alan Page's picture Alan Page
A Bug Begets a Bug

In his April 2005 column, "After the Bug Report," Danny R. Faught suggested that when you're testing a bug fix, you should also look for additional bugs. This week, he expands on that idea, showing you how one bug report can multiply into many more bugs.

Danny R. Faught's picture Danny R. Faught
Location! Location! Location!

In real estate, it's not so much which house you buy as where you buy it. The same is true for bugs—the bug itself isn't as important as pinpointing where the bug lives and breeds. Learn one way to track down a bug's true source and prevent it from recurring.

Adam Kolawa
The Case of the Crashing Test Site

Tom McGreal warns you of problems that may be lurking in your deployment environment.

Tom McGreal

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