Articles

The Agile Manifesto Let the Agile Manifesto Guide Your Software Testing

Although its values are commonly associated with agile software development, the Agile Manifesto applies to all people and teams following the agile mindset, including testers. This article examines the four main values of the Agile Manifesto and reveals how they can bring agility to test efforts—improving quality for your team and your customers.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Agile icon 5 Ways Agile Testing Is Different from Traditional Testing

It’s the distinctions between agile and traditional software development approaches, as well as the adaptability of testers in these very different environments, that makes agile testing different from traditional testing. Agile demands more from its testers, and, in turn, it values them more, too. Let’s look at five main things that make an agile tester’s life different from that of a traditional tester.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
circle of continuous arrows Learn Agile Techniques to Become a More Valuable Tester

Agile is still on the rise, with many organizations that have been successful at the team level looking to scale their adoption. Consequently, it's important for testers to have practical application of agile techniques. You should know how to create tests to optimize maximum test coverage, have interpersonal skills, and successfully build relationships within the team.

Leanne Howard's picture Leanne Howard
functional testing Kanban chart Kanban for Software Testing Teams

Kanban, a highly effective agile framework, is based on the philosophy that everything can be improved. And it's not just for development teams. The QA team also can use kanban to organize tasks, identify bottlenecks, and make their processes clearer and more consistent.

Sofía Palamarchuk's picture Sofía Palamarchuk
Agile leadership Seven Signs of Great Agile Leadership

Agile teams are self-organizing, which means they do not need supervisors—at least in theory. But they do need leaders to create a shared vision of what the product will be. And having an agile team means that anyone can step up … including you. Lanette Creamer outlines seven qualities possessed by great agile leaders.

Lanette  Creamer's picture Lanette Creamer
Test automation Test Automation in the Agile World

After decades of talking about test automation, the agile movement suddenly seems to be taking it seriously. You might be wondering what all the buzz is about. Sanjay Zalavadia talks about why test tooling is suddenly so critical, when teams should think of automating, and how to bring the change so that your team will embrace it.

Sanjay Zalavadia's picture Sanjay Zalavadia
Traceable Tests Guide Your Agile Development with Traceable Tests

Testing professionals who are learning about agile often want to know how they can provide traceability among automated tests, features, and bugs and report on their testing progress. Here, Lisa Crispin gives an example of how her previous team worked together to integrate testing with coding and helped everyone see testing progress at a glance.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Technical Practices Accelerating the Adoption of Technical Practices

Agile teams are supposed to take responsibility for how they work and how they learn. But what if you need to jump-start that learning? Agile transformation is about making this happen rather than waiting for it to happen. You need to get your team to learn the technical side of agile, and soon. Here are some effective approaches.

Scott Barnes's picture Scott Barnes Clifford Berg
Testers in an Agile Environment The Role of Testers in an Agile Environment

There are many diverse ideas about what being a tester means in agile development environments. This leads to confusion between how agile testers and agile QA “fit” into agile teams and what the QA tester responsibilities are. John Stevenson explains why there appears to be some fear and a little distrust of agile environments among some testers, then offers suggestions for dealing with their confusion.

John Stevenson's picture John Stevenson
No Quick Fix Management Myth 33: We Need a Quick Fix or a Silver Bullet

A new approach to projects or a new tool is not a quick fix or a silver bullet. Too often, you have ingrained, systemic problems that require a cultural change. That doesn’t mean a new approach or a new tool won’t help. It can. But you also need to adjust the environment that caused the problems in the first place.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman

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