testing

Articles

Red rubber stamp that says "Rejected" Use the Rejected Defect Ratio to Improve Bug Reporting

There are many metrics to measure the effectiveness of a testing team. One is the rejected defect ratio, or the number of rejected bug reports divided by the total submitted bug reports. You may think you want zero rejected bugs, but there are several reasons that’s not the case. Let's look at types of rejected bugs, see how they contribute to the rejected defect ratio, and explore the right ratio for your team.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Arrow pointing to the right Shifting Right Offers New Possibilities for Agile and DevOps Teams

The shift-right concept originates from testing. But agile and DevOps teams also can use it to improve their systems and service to the client. However, there is a complicating factor: Different people have different explanations for what shifting right is. Let’s look at the different forms of shifting right, what the potential benefits are, and who should ideally be involved in your shift-right process.

Pytest logo Lessons Learned Switching Manual Tests to Pytest

If you want to start automating your test cases, László Szegedi makes an argument for using the popular Python and Selenium combination. Here, he gives a test script you can use after every release to find any serious regression bugs in the system, to be executed automatically. Integrate it with your existing development pipeline and you get a pretty useful tool for continuous improvement.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Person holding a map A Beginner's Guide to Test Automation

If you’re new to automated testing, you’re probably starting off with a lot of questions: How do I know which tests to automate? Why is automated testing useful for me and my team? How do I choose a tool or framework? This article answers a lot of those questions—and gives you some more to consider!—so you have an excellent foundation for beginning your automation endeavors.

Angela Riggs's picture Angela Riggs
Michael Bolton Is All Testing Exploratory? A Slack Takeover with Michael Bolton

Thought leaders from the software community are taking over the TechWell Hub for a day to answer questions and engage in conversations. Michael Bolton, a speaker and thought leader in the testing industry, hosted this Slack takeover, which led to discussions about test exploration, tools, and testers as gatekeepers.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
A piece of plain paper laid over a pile of other paper with typed words Overcoming Challenges to Good Test Documentation

Getting good test documentation is a consistent challenge. Agile proposes that you should go very light on documentation, and while test documentation does not need to be heavy, it does need to be clear and cover all that the product is intended to do so you can ensure testing is consistent and results are recorded. Here's how to overcome some major barriers to getting good test documentation.

Steven Penella's picture Steven Penella
A tesselated pattern of gray tiles Test Tooling Patterns for Solving Problems

A design pattern consists of the pattern name, the problem it solves, how to implement the solution, and some consequences. There are also proven patterns like this that can be used in testing. This article lists and defines many commonly used patterns that can help you solve problems, improve code maintenance, and just make your life easier.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Graphic of test automation tools The TERMS for Test Automation Risk or Success

Automation is a service to testing—a tool that may prove to be useful or turn wasteful. When approaching test automation, there are five main areas to focus on, expressed in the acronym TERMS: Tools and Technology, Execution, Requirements, Maintenance, and Security. Here are some examples of how these factors are involved in defining automation success or failures.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
Red octagonal stop sign 3 Testing Practices We Should All Stop

Testing evolves, and it becomes clear that some concepts we’re all used to doing are no longer applicable today. It’s important to periodically take stock of our testing practices and cull the ones that no longer make sense—or are downright harmful. Here are three common testing practices it’s in our best interests to stop doing.

Ajay Balamurugadas's picture Ajay Balamurugadas
Test pyramid with the base unit test layer eroded The Eroding Agile Test Pyramid

The test pyramid is a great model for designing your test portfolio. However, the bottom tends to fall out when you shift from progression testing to regression testing. The tests start failing, eroding the number of working unit tests at the base of your pyramid. If you don't have the development resources required for continuous unit test maintenance, there are still things you can do.

Wolfgang Platz's picture Wolfgang Platz

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