testing

Articles

Developers and testers giving each other useful feedback Improve Tester-Developer Relationships with Helpful Feedback

Testers and developers often have a strained relationship. Each side has a certain level of expectations as to what the other side should know and do, while there is little understanding of the constraints, conditions, and requirements that the other team has to work within. But it does not have to be this way. A little effort in giving more specific and helpful feedback can go a long way toward improving attitudes.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Cursor hovering over the word "Security" on a computer screen Integrating Security and Testing Practices

QA and information security use different methods to approach the same goals. When both groups work together, they can make a greater impact on the security of our products. Here's how the QA team can collaborate with infosec to implement strong security standards, prioritize what to test, and obtain quicker feedback on processes, ultimately seeing fewer production incidents related to security.

Sylvia Killinen's picture Sylvia Killinen
Brain made of computer circuits and binary code A Simpler Way of Using Machine Learning to Shift Testing Left

The advantages of shifting left and testing as early as possible are obvious. But as you automate more testing, the test suite grows larger and larger, and it takes longer and longer to run. Instead, just automate the process of finding the right set of tests to run. The key to that is machine learning. This isn't AI bots finding bugs autonomously without creating tests; this is a different way to use machine learning, and it’s far simpler.

James Farrier's picture James Farrier
Describe and create three negative test

Three examples of negeative test

Examples of Scenario testing

Examples of Soap testing

Ogadinma N Njoku
Pyramid in Egypt Inverting the Test Automation Pyramid

A growing company was tasked to develop a test automation program from scratch, change its coding practices, and build a continuous testing toolchain. Martin Ivison details how they did it, including realizing that implementing the traditional test pyramid wasn't going to work—it would have to be turned upside down. They found out that small is beautiful, cheap is good, and cultural change matters.

Martin Ivison's picture Martin Ivison
Artificial intelligence bot AI-Driven Test Automation and Your Future

Many software testers are lamenting the impending demise of their jobs thanks to artificial intelligence. But Jon Hagar thinks there's no need to panic just yet. Here, he details some capabilities he's seen in AI, relates how these can be used in software testing, and explains why he thinks most people don't have to worry—although he also explains who should! As usual, it comes down to a willingness to learn new things.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar
Team members fitting puzzle pieces together Whole-Team Testing for Whole-Team Quality

Whole-team testing means the whole team understands and participates in testing, using testing education as a tool to support quality efforts. And to be able to support testing in a meaningful way, team members must experience how testing is done by professional testers. Understanding skilled testing can help non-testers realize what quality criteria should be there and what elements of a product contribute to great quality.

Lalit Bhamare's picture Lalit Bhamare
Talia Nassi Testing in Production: An Interview with Talia Nassi

Talia Nassi, a software engineer at WeWork, discusses why testing in production is such a controversial topic. She talks about why people fear the process and how a change with intention would increase confidence in your team. Talia also shares how the Women Who Test community supported her and helped constitute the life and career she has today. 

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Shachar Schiff Communication Is Everything: A Conversation with Shachar Schiff

Shachar Schiff, founder and principal consultant at BadTesting, chats with TechWell community manager Owen Gotimer about the recent rebrand of BadTesting, the four archetypes he uses to help customers, and the universal importance of communication.

Continue the conversation with Shachar (@Shak) and Owen (@owen) on the TechWell Hub (http://hub.techwell.com/)!

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
Tester holding up a pair of eyeglasses Testing What You Can’t See: Risk Blindness in Coverage Models

The way we think about what necessitates test coverage being “complete” influences how we test and the cases we create. After all, you wouldn't design tests for situations that don't occur to you—and you can't test what you can't see. It's time to take off the blinders. Here's how you can find where the bugs in your products are occurring, and then adjust your strategy to pinpoint them.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser

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