test management

Articles

Thinking cap Want More Innovative Testing? Put on a Different Thinking Cap

Testers commonly face challenges around one-dimensional thinking, limited ideas, and communication issues. Sometimes, all you need to break out of a comfort zone or come up with better approaches is a fresh perspective. Putting on a different “thinking cap” can help you innovate solutions in a whole new way.

Rajini  Padmanaban's picture Rajini Padmanaban
Clock: adding value How Testers Can Add Value Earlier in the Development Lifecycle

Before you can achieve continuous delivery, you need to first start implementing continuous integration. Some say CI is just for developers, but testers also play their own important roles. This article describes solutions that will help you add value to the development lifecycle—whether you work in an agile, DevOps, or traditional context.

Antoin Boerboom's picture Antoin Boerboom
Check mark: performance testing Modern Application Performance Testing

In order to understand if performance matches needs, testing is a necessity. While there are many areas that help define testing parameters, three overarching testing concepts must be addressed in order to provide appropriate performance for modern applications: your users, your data, and your environment.

Terri Calderone's picture Terri Calderone
Selenium testing tool Why Selenium Should Be Your UI Test Tool

Selecting a testing tool is hard work. If you look on vendor websites, you'll get marketing material promising the world. If you look on forums, you'll mostly get people trying to solve their own problems. Justin Rohrman tells you why you might choose Selenium as your UI testing tool, based on real experience with real software projects—rather than a marketing page.

Justin Rohrman's picture Justin Rohrman
Evidence of software testing “How Was This Tested?” Providing Evidence of Your Testing

Many testers have a tendency to minimize the information they record when testing. The challenge comes when problems are found later, possibly after the software is in production. How do we remember what we did, and when? What records do we have to refer to? How do we, as testers, answer the question “How was this tested?”

Peter Walen's picture Peter Walen
Find Yourself Overloaded What to Do When You Find Yourself Overloaded

As much as you might want to multitask, there is a limit to how much work in progress can be handled at once. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed—whether due to your own commitments or because management keeps piling on more projects—assess the situation and see what you can do to improve your condition without letting your work suffer.

Timothy Western's picture Timothy Western
Load Testing Environment Six Tips for Building a Better Load Testing Environment

Building a realistic test environment is essential for the success of your load testing, but it is also a challenging task that can require resolving technological, organizational, and security issues. This article can serve as a roadmap for building a faster and more efficient load testing environment that leads to quicker deployments.

David (Dudu) Buch's picture David (Dudu) Buch
Bug Tracker Clean Up Your Bug Tracker and Keep Numbers Manageable

A good team likely is trained to consistently report defects as accurately and promptly as possible. This means that over time the bug backlog builds up, and looking for what bugs to fix starts to seem like searching for a needle in a haystack. The best way to keep your tracker under control is to improve the quality curve earlier.

Timothy Western's picture Timothy Western
Load Testing Cloud Load Testing and Sizing Considerations for the Cloud

When it comes to load testing in the cloud, going bigger is not always better. This article describes how organizations can utilize load testing to help right-size a production system being built in the cloud, allowing their project teams to build an ideal system that is not too small and under-performing for their needs and not too large and costly.

Don Prather's picture Don Prather
Software Quality Being the Devil’s Advocate for Software Quality

What if someone were to say that most of the time, quality does not matter? That you should only aim for the minimal amount of investment in testing to get the product out the door to start making money? Here, Rob Cross takes the “devil’s advocate” position and provides some arguments against striving for quality. How would you refute them?

Rob Cross's picture Rob Cross

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