requirements management

Articles

Management and Team Details “Let’s Just Get Started and We Can Figure Out the Details Later”

Regardless of your organization’s approach, if everyone is not aligned on what defines project success, you are headed for trouble. Well-defined success criteria are the guardrails that keep the project on track to meet business expectations. Ryan McClish and Kenton Bohn tell you why you should get all the details figured out now rather than later.

Ryan McClish's picture Ryan McClish Kenton Bohn
Requirements for Testing 3 Types of Requirements for Testing

Requirements for software are usually grouped into a bewildering array of categories. Functional and nonfunctional requirements are on top, and a huge number of subcategories are underneath. Here, Clint Hoagland boils it down to three categories, differentiated by the way they should be tested.

Clint Hoagland's picture Clint Hoagland
Testing Requirements Redistributed Testing: A Shift to Refine Requirements

In short, redistributed testing is a shift in the emphasis and responsibility for testing. Testers are reassigned to work closer to the business with users or business analysts or are embedded in the development team.By being involved in story and scenario writing, the testers help to refine requirements and improve their quality. How could your systems benefit from redistributed testing?

Paul Gerrard's picture Paul Gerrard
How to Maintain a Compatible User Experience How to Maintain a Compatible User Experience

Tara Nicholson explains why it's important to take into account compatibility, which refers to the ability of a software system to function across a variety of client software (browsers), operating systems, and hardware combinations. In this article, Tara shares some helpful strategies for you to consider when maintaining a compatible user experience.

Tara Nicholson's picture Tara Nicholson
 Assumptions to Model Value (or Not) Using Goals, Objectives, and Assumptions to Model Value (or Not)

Kent McDonald writes that identifying objectives and the assumptions underlying them provides you a way to measure whether the result of your project will actually get you closer to what you are trying to accomplish, as well as the impact your various assumptions have on reaching that objective. 

Kent J. McDonald's picture Kent J. McDonald
Using Agile for Requirements Management Using Agile for Requirements Management

Charuta Phansalkar writes on the necessity of capturing and understanding requirements using agile practices. Agile, when implemented effectively, will ensure that the customer's voice is clearly understood throughout the project, which results in maximum customer satisfaction.

Charuta Phansalkar's picture Charuta Phansalkar
Traceability in a Practical Way How to Implement CM and Traceability in a Practical Way

Software development can often be a very complex endeavor, so it is no wonder that important details can sometimes get lost in the process. Here, Bob Aiello discusses how to implement configuration management (CM) and traceability in a practical and realistic way.

Bob Aiello's picture Bob Aiello
 CM Professionals Need to Know about Business Requirements What CM Professionals Need to Know about Business Requirements

While we know the technology, some configuration management (CM) experts don’t always have a strong enough business focus, which can be a real problem. Read on if you would like to understand what CM professionals need to know about business requirements and how CM can directly impact the business itself.

Bob Aiello's picture Bob Aiello
 Thinking Up Front about Agile Requirements An Agile Approach to Thinking Up Front about Requirements

Thinking about interacting with the customer at the start of the project? Who would argue against that? Well, it depends on what you call it. It also depends on whether you then do it without the benefit of the rest of the project team. Here, Ulrika Park helps us see what an agile approach to thinking about the requirements might look like.

Ulrika Park's picture Ulrika Park
Seven (Terrible) Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Manage Risks, and Thoughtful Responses to Each of Them

Proposing more effective risk management is essentially suggesting a change to the way people do things. Payson Hall explains seven dismissive remarks you might encounter if you propose increased risk-management rigor.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall

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