Articles

Managing Capital Project Interoperability Managing Capital Project Interoperability

Capital projects inherently involve integrating the work of numerous subcontractors for the on-time delivery of hundreds of facility systems and millions of project deliverables. If your company is involved in any of the lifecycle stages of a process facility, this article will help you learn some of the current pitfalls.

David Lawton's picture David Lawton
How to Know When Things Are Really Done How to Know When Things Are Really Done

Do you know when your work is done? Are you sure your feature is done? How about your release? Do you know when it’s done? Leyton Collins has some suggestions for you, your team, and your organization on how to know when things are really done.

Leyton Collins's picture Leyton Collins
FAQ: How Can I Be a Better Product Owner?

In this installment of FAQ, SQE Trainer Arlen Bankston answers one of the questions students ask him most often.

Arlen Bankston's picture Arlen Bankston
Supporting Sound Business Decisions: Separating the Clerks from the Project Managers

Payson Hall writes that we do our profession a disservice when we describe project management as merely the challenging clerical task of defining projects, building schedules, and tracking against them. Managing the interface between the project and the organizational context is absolutely part of a project manager’s job, whether there is a portfolio management team to help or not.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
To Manage Change, Recognize That It Entails Loss

Adjusting to change entails coming to terms with loss. Keep that in mind if you want to ease the challenge people face in coping with change. In this article, Naomi Karten describes someone who never learned this lesson and what he might have done differently.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
 Thinking Up Front about Agile Requirements An Agile Approach to Thinking Up Front about Requirements

Thinking about interacting with the customer at the start of the project? Who would argue against that? Well, it depends on what you call it. It also depends on whether you then do it without the benefit of the rest of the project team. Here, Ulrika Park helps us see what an agile approach to thinking about the requirements might look like.

Ulrika Park's picture Ulrika Park
Considering Offshore Software Testing? Considering Offshore Software Testing? There’s a Better Solution for Your Business

Offshoring isn’t going away. But maybe we can be more intelligent about how we do it. Margaret Dineen has some ideas about how not to offshore and she shares them with us today.

Margaret Dineen
Fix Your Agile Project by Taking a Systems View Fix Your Agile Project by Taking a Systems View

Kathy Iberle writes that when working on a project, you should take a systems view, which allows you to see the whole development system at once. When you put on your “systems view” glasses, you’ll see that you need to deal with the whole system, not just a single team’s part of it.

Kathy Iberle
Piece By Piece: Test Estimation and Planning in Agile Teams

The iterative agile methodology provides a clearer vision, smaller time scale, and closer planning horizon. The authors look at approaches to estimation and planning, from product backlog grooming to task-estimating tables and more.

Building a Backlog for Legacy System Changes

Kent McDonald writes that teams often assume that they cannot split their changes into small stories because the resulting stories would not provide value. What they fail to realize is that they can split these bigger changes into smaller changes and gain value by showing their stakeholders, getting feedback, and incorporating that feedback in their continued development.

Kent J. McDonald's picture Kent J. McDonald

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