people management

Articles

Agile Cycle New Ideas for Effective Localization Testing Practices in an Agile Cycle

While practices in localization testing have been suggested for every environment, it is becoming even more important to have such practices for an agile localization test effort. This is a list of ideas to help ensure on-time, on-cost product releases, synchronized efforts for releases in all languages, and good collaboration among team members.

Rajini  Padmanaban's picture Rajini Padmanaban
People Aren't Interchangeable Management Myth 32: I Can Treat People as Interchangeable Resources

It is unfortunate that the department attending to employees is called “Human Resources.” That language colors what managers call people in the organization. But the more you call people “resources,” the more they become interchangeable—and more like desks, or infrastructure, or something that is easily negotiable. Resources are not people. People are not resources.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Simple and Fast in Business Why Does the Business Think Everything Should Be Simple, Fast, and Cheap?

Whether they're on the business side or the IT side, professionals in the software industry tend to agree that more communication about project expectations is needed. So why is it that when the two sides collaborate, bad things seem to happen? Ryan McClish and Kenton Bohn analyze the human dynamics and show how to build a solution that accomplishes the defined goals.

Kenton Bohn's picture Kenton Bohn Ryan McClish
Thirty Days as Test Lead My First Thirty Days as a Test Lead: Expectations and Reality

Justin Rohrman took on a new role in his career: test lead. He wrote down his observations about the first thirty days in this position, recording what really happened when he changed jobs, what challenges he encountered with his new team, and how he and his coworkers resolved problems. His synopsis could be useful to any project team.

Justin Rohrman's picture Justin Rohrman
Spiral of an Organization Avoiding the Organizational Death Spiral

The death spiral supersedes the death march in that the death march is a singular event, whereas the death spiral is systemic. It is the result of organizational dysfunction where teams march toward deadline after deadline without reflecting on or questioning if there is a better way to deliver software. There is! Take these positive steps.

Thomas Wessel's picture Thomas Wessel
Workplace Flexibility The Right Approach to Workplace Flexibility

Policies like variable work hours and working from home are generally perceived to be employee perks, but they have benefits for the employers as well. However, the implementation of such policies lacks depth in most organizations. The right execution and monitoring is critical in ensuring good outcomes are achieved and misuse is minimized.

Saurabh  Arora's picture Saurabh Arora
Making Difficult Choices Myth 31: I Don’t Have to Make the Difficult Choices

"Don't bring me problems; bring me solutions." Sound familiar? Sounds like a management cop out to Johanna Rothman. A primary purpose of managers is to help their teams perform to the best of their abilities, and that includes stepping up and making tough decisions to help solve problems.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Changing an Organization Methods of Changing an Organization

What do you do when you notice your organization has cultural flaws in it—flaws deeper than could be fixed with just a minor process improvement or one simple discussion with your boss? You could quit and find a culture you like better, or keep your head down and be a cog in the machine—or you could try to subtly shift the way things operate yourself. This article details how you can go about effecting cultural change in your organization.

Jeremy Carey-Dressler's picture Jeremy Carey-Dressler
Management Value Management Myth 30: I Am More Valuable than Other People

Just because you have a fancy job title doesn't mean you can manage your team members by bossing them around. Servant leadership is an important skill for managers, as the best managers are those who serve the people who work for them.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Human Teams Lessons from Optimizing Computer Systems Applied to Human Teams

Payson Hall learned some lessons from optimizing data system performance that could relate to human team management and leadership. For instance, if a system is overworked, it can't be any more productive beyond a certain point; the same is true for people. Both also can get more done by minimizing multitasking and prioritizing jobs. Read on to learn more from machines.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall

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