people management

Articles

A developer and a tester looking at each other warily Examining Cross-functionality Bias on Software Development Teams

Cross-functionality means having all the necessary people and skills on one self-organizing team. Unfortunately, the execution of cross-functionality is often biased. The main traps we fall into are misunderstanding the value of specialization, hero worship, and not “walking the cross-functional talk” as organizations. Let’s examine each of these pitfalls in the hope that your teams may avoid them.

Natalie Warnert's picture Natalie Warnert
Encouraging growth Agile Managers: Trust Your Team and Encourage Innovation

In order to fully embrace agile and create an environment where individuals want to work together as a team, managers have to move from a role of dictation to one of direction and mentorship. Instead of making all the decisions, managers need to trust their team members and empower them to solve problems on their own, innovate, and fail—or succeed.

Lisa Rich's picture Lisa Rich Mic Riley
Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team Book Review: Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team

Jurgen Appelo’s useful and fun-to-read book Managing for Happiness: Games, Tools, and Practices to Motivate Any Team gives you concrete tools to identify ways to help your team be happier and to create environments where people can thrive and be more productive. Despite the word managing being in the title, the book is a beneficial read for anyone.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
implementing gears Getting Employees On Board when Implementing Change Management

Change is a difficult but important part of business. It can be most difficult on the employees, but if you involve them in the planning process and make an effort to understand their points of view, you can mitigate resistance and facilitate the experience for everyone. This article deals specifically with ERP implementation, but its advice is useful for any change management situation.

RK Prasad's picture RK Prasad
hands holding letter Dear Software Development Manager: A Letter from Your Testers

More and more, testers are being added to programming teams. We testers think that's great, and we're happy to be here. But we also have some concerns based on our interactions with development teams in the past. To make the transition easier, here's a letter pointing out some things you should know when managing testers on your development team.

Marcus Blankenship's picture Marcus Blankenship
goldfish leaping from one fish bowl to another The Secret to Change Management: Creating a New Tradition

When we try to implement new processes, there is often resistance from the team. People get so used to their typical habits that it doesn't occur to them that there could be a better way to do things. To get buy-in from everyone, you need to understand the current traditions, then think about how you can set an example to start making the processes a new tradition.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
welcome mat Accepting the Tester into the DevOps Fold

Today’s tester has moved upstream, along with the test processes, where he is involved right from the product design stages. This can create great opportunities for the team to bond, but if not handled well, it can become a breeding ground for strained relations. Adopting DevOps means promoting collaboration.

Rajini  Padmanaban's picture Rajini Padmanaban
accessibility restroom sign The Politics of Accessibility Testing

Web accessibility is often spoken about in terms of design, programming challenges, frameworks, and technical solutions, but there are also personal difficulties for the people involved. This article addresses some of the cases of initial resistance and provides a few practical ideas on how to minimize the challenges.

Albert Gareev's picture Albert Gareev
programming languages Less Is More: Picking Your Test Automation Language

It's a classic dispute: Two test automation engineers can't agree on which programming language to use. In some contexts, the strong points of a certain language definitively make it the right choice, but what do you do when either language could work well for a project? That's when it becomes a managerial decision.

Michael Stahl's picture Michael Stahl
Agile leadership Seven Signs of Great Agile Leadership

Agile teams are self-organizing, which means they do not need supervisors—at least in theory. But they do need leaders to create a shared vision of what the product will be. And having an agile team means that anyone can step up … including you. Lanette Creamer outlines seven qualities possessed by great agile leaders.

Lanette  Creamer's picture Lanette Creamer

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