leadership

Articles

Team of Testers Developing a Team of Testers

As the leader, your team's development is your responsibility. In order to keep good people, you have to allow them the opportunity to improve themselves. You need to be aware of the different levels of testers there are in the team, the abilities each level of tester has, and what motivates every individual.

Isaac Howard's picture Isaac Howard
People Aren't Interchangeable Management Myth 32: I Can Treat People as Interchangeable Resources

It is unfortunate that the department attending to employees is called “Human Resources.” That language colors what managers call people in the organization. But the more you call people “resources,” the more they become interchangeable—and more like desks, or infrastructure, or something that is easily negotiable. Resources are not people. People are not resources.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Thirty Days as Test Lead My First Thirty Days as a Test Lead: Expectations and Reality

Justin Rohrman took on a new role in his career: test lead. He wrote down his observations about the first thirty days in this position, recording what really happened when he changed jobs, what challenges he encountered with his new team, and how he and his coworkers resolved problems. His synopsis could be useful to any project team.

Justin Rohrman's picture Justin Rohrman
Making Difficult Choices Myth 31: I Don’t Have to Make the Difficult Choices

"Don't bring me problems; bring me solutions." Sound familiar? Sounds like a management cop out to Johanna Rothman. A primary purpose of managers is to help their teams perform to the best of their abilities, and that includes stepping up and making tough decisions to help solve problems.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Changing an Organization Methods of Changing an Organization

What do you do when you notice your organization has cultural flaws in it—flaws deeper than could be fixed with just a minor process improvement or one simple discussion with your boss? You could quit and find a culture you like better, or keep your head down and be a cog in the machine—or you could try to subtly shift the way things operate yourself. This article details how you can go about effecting cultural change in your organization.

Jeremy Carey-Dressler's picture Jeremy Carey-Dressler
Management Value Management Myth 30: I Am More Valuable than Other People

Just because you have a fancy job title doesn't mean you can manage your team members by bossing them around. Servant leadership is an important skill for managers, as the best managers are those who serve the people who work for them.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Testers Quality Standards When Testers Should Stand Up and Say No

Testers often find themselves in predicaments where they may be asked to compromise on quality standards—whether it's pressure to sign off on a product before it's ready, getting involved in numbers games that value metrics above all else, or facing harassment to take on work that isn't theirs. Knowing when, how, and why to say no can improve your situation and gain respect for testers everywhere.

Mukesh Sharma's picture Mukesh Sharma
Human Teams Lessons from Optimizing Computer Systems Applied to Human Teams

Payson Hall learned some lessons from optimizing data system performance that could relate to human team management and leadership. For instance, if a system is overworked, it can't be any more productive beyond a certain point; the same is true for people. Both also can get more done by minimizing multitasking and prioritizing jobs. Read on to learn more from machines.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
 Myth 28: I Can Standardize How Other People Work Management Myth 28: I Can Standardize How Other People Work

Johanna Rothman writes that organization-wide standards don’t help if management imposes them. If people ask for help with standards, then you can provide local help to each team. And if the teams are part of a program where you have one business objective common to multiple projects, make sure the program understands the problem.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
QA Management: All Bark and No Bite? QA Management: All Bark and No Bite?

Mike Talks shares with us the unlikely story of how his pet German Shepherd inadvertently became his team's QA manager. Talks explains how his German Shepherd was able to gather people together and have them talk to each other, similiar to what a QA manager does—keeping people on task, handing out assignments, and following up with team members.

Mike Talks's picture Mike Talks

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