Articles

Management Myth #4: I Don't Need One-on-Ones

One-on-ones aren’t for status reports. They aren’t just for knowing all the projects. They are for feedback and coaching, and meta-feedback and meta-coaching, and for fine-tuning the organization. If you are a manager and you aren’t using one-on-ones, you are not using the most important management tool you have.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
The Weighing Scale Management Myth Management Myth #3: We Must Treat Everyone the Same Way

One of the biggest management myths is, “I must treat everyone the same way.” Nothing could be further from the truth. Everyone has different goals for their career, and those change over the course of a career.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Management Myth #2: Only ‘The Expert’ Can Perform This Work

How many times have you seen this in your projects: You need something specific done such as a new database, or a specific user interface designed, or you need a release engineer, or a user interface designer, or a part of the system tested and the normal person who does that work is not available? What happens on your project? Does it wait until The Expert is available?

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
We Are Not Alone

Do you know colleagues who box themselves into the corner regularly? Getting lost is not the problem; coping with having gotten lost is the problem. Markus Gärtner explains how to notice that you are stuck, how to ask for help, and who you should be asking.

Markus Gärtner's picture Markus Gärtner
12 Essential Skills for Software Architects book cover Dave Hendricksen's 12 Essential Skills for Software Architects

In this TechWell interview, Dave Hendricksen, author of 12 Essential Skills for Software Architects, discusses his new book that covers the soft skills that technical people should learn.

Joey McAllister's picture Joey McAllister
Dependable vs. Irreplaceable

We all like being in demand, feeling wanted, and being dependable. But, we forget that there is a thin line between being dependable and irreplaceable. The result is not only a loss of credibility but also a loss of opportunities

Rinku Sahay's picture Rinku Sahay
Why Testers and QA Engineers Need to Learn Continuously

Information technology changes fast, and none of us knows what our future holds. It’s hard to keep up with new programming languages, patterns, tools, frameworks, design techniques, and practices. If you’re a programmer who doesn’t keep her skills up to date, you won’t get the best job opportunities—in fact, you might not get any. Yet, we observe many people who call themselves testers or quality assurance professionals but don’t make much effort to learn new things.

Old Habits Die Hard

It’s easy to develop habits in one environment that don’t translate to a new environment. Here are some tips to keep old habits from holding you back.

Dawn Code's picture Dawn Code
Reducing Surprise: Another Feature of Good Project Management

The portions of projects that are not yet complete occur in the future. Since the future is an uncertain place, there will always be surprises. Some surprises are so obvious that they should hardly be called surprises at all. This is the kind of surprise that project management helps to avoid.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
Ten Frontiers for Software Testing

In May 2010, the first Writing About Testing conference brought some of the top minds in the field together to discuss the current state of public discourse on software testing and areas where testing is evolving within the realm of software development. In this column, Chris McMahon, who designed and launched the conference, continues his mission to advance the discussion by sharing ten of the most interesting frontiers for software testing.

Chris McMahon's picture Chris McMahon

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