Conference Presentations

Testers and Testing in the Agile Development

You have heard about agile software development techniques such as eXtreme Programming (XP), Scrum, and Agile Modeling (AM). The industry is buzzing with everything from "this is the greatest thing ever" to "it's just hacking with a fancy new name." Comments like "there is no place for testers because developers and users do the testing now" and "testers play an important role in the agile methods" are both common. Scott Ambler, an early proponent of the agile movement, explains the fundamentals, values, and principles of agile development. He describes a range of agile techniques and explores many myths and misconceptions surrounding agility. Agile software development is real, it works, and it may be an important part of your future in testing. Better testing and improved quality are critical aspects of agile software development, but the roles of traditional testers and QA professionals on agile projects remain unclear.

Scott Ambler, Ronin International, Inc.
A Strategic Approach - "Beta the Business"

Beta testing is an industry standard practice to obtain user feedback prior to general availability of software. Have you ever considered that the Beta release can be used to validate the software's value to customers and application users? Extending the Beta concept will result in higher customer satisfaction (and higher revenue for commercial products). Also, you can employ Beta testing to evaluate not only the software product, but the distribution (and sales) process, training, customer support, and usage within your customers' environments. Far beyond just finding defects in the product, you can focus Beta testing on how well the software is meeting your customers' needs. What does that mean to the Development team and the organization as a whole? What are the risks and challenges that we face? What are the rewards?

Pete Conway, EMC Corporation
Service-Oriented Architecture - Exposed

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), incorporating methods for Web services to communicate dynamically, promises to significantly improve organizational operating efficiency, change the way companies conduct business, and even alter the competitive landscape. However, Service-Oriented Architecture is a strategy rather than an objective, and, like any strategy, it is of no value unless it is implemented. With illustrations from companies who today are using SOA to transform their organizations, Sharon Fay shares current practices for exposing Web services and XML to internal development teams, outsourced development, external trading partners, and customers. Learn why reuse is a key method for supporting integration of SOA implementations and how it is being accomplished. Take away a set of metrics that you can use to measure the level of SOA adoption, development productivity gains, and organizational agility.

Sharon Fay, Flashline, Inc.
eXtreme Architecture and Design for Test

eXtreme programming emphasizes test-first coding-you write the tests before writing the implementation code. You can apply the same approach in design when developing a complex system, including an architecture to support testing. To be successful, systems developed with agile methods must support a high level of testability and test automation. For large distributed systems, more sophisticated testing is needed to help determine which components may be contributing to failures. For such complex systems, you should architect the system for testing rather than add testing functionality as an afterthought. Ken Pugh presents a framework that employs polymorphic-style internal and external interface patterns to ease the work of testing and debugging. He also covers adding test-only functionality, test-only outputs, and test-only logging to interfaces.

Ken Pugh, Pugh-Killeen Associates
GUI Usability Design and Validation with Paper Prototypes

Usability testing of early GUI designs with paper prototypes validates that you are building the right applications for your customers. This low-cost, high-impact practice allows you to rapidly evolve the GUI interface and find many design bugs early in the development process before coding begins. With this process, you can get external customers and internal users actively involved in designing and testing the GUI with tools they can easily manipulate. Based on project experiences at The MathWorks, Inc., you will learn how to move from the paper prototype to a coded GUI and a set of automated tests. In addition, you will learn to develop user documentation while working back and forth between the GUI and the test plan to clarify design choices.

  • Involving everyone in GUI design early in the project
  • User tasks and scenarios as the basis for GUI validation
Ann Walker, The MathWorks Inc
Undoing Testing Methods in Agile Projects

The period 2002-2004 was one of enormous progress in figuring out how testing fits in on agile projects. Test-driven design is more about designing and writing the code than about finding bugs. New testing tools such as xUnit and FIT came out and received a lot of use by early adopters. The hopeful notion that customers would write acceptance tests to find bugs was expanded, challenged, and deepened. With all that progress, it's hard to be dissatisfied with these methods in agile projects. But past ways of thinking are holding us back. To make further progress, we have to split our notion of testing into two parts: the task of after-the-fact product critique, and a role that has nothing at all to do with bugs and, really, little to do with the word "testing." Brian Marick, a founding member of the Agile Alliance, explains what that role presents and some ideas on how to fill it.

Brian Marick, Testing Foundations
Design Patterns in Test Driven Development

Design patterns are powerful tools when understood and employed properly. Combining design patterns and test-driven development (TDD) using a set of design principles will achieve higher productivity and quality than either practice alone. With numerous code snippets as examples, Thirumalesh Bhat describes the design principles and resulting patterns that have been extracted from TDD practices at Microsoft. Learn more about these design principles: commonality/variability analysis, open/closed principle, high cohesion, low coupling, prototyping, designing for current features, single point of maintenance, refactoring, unit testing, testability, and cost/benefit analysis. Adapt and apply these principles and design patterns to your TDD projects for the same benefits.

  • Fundamental principles of design patterns
  • Test-driven development (TDD) and refactoring
Thirumalesh Bhat, Microsoft Corporation
Design Testability and Service Level Measurements into Software

Design and architecture decisions made early in the project have a profound influence on the testability of an application. Although testing is a necessary and integral part of application development, architecture and design considerations rarely include the impacts of development design decisions on testability. In addition, build vs. buy, third party controls, open source vs. proprietary, and other similar questions can affect greatly the ability of an organization to carry out automated functional and performance testing-both positively and negatively. If the software or service is delivered to a separate set of end-users who then need to perform testing activities, the problems compound. Join Jay Weiser to find out about the important design and architecture decisions that will ensure more efficient and effective testability of your applications.

Jay Weiser, WorkSoft
Patterns for Writing Effective Use Cases

Use cases are a wonderfully simple concept: document a system's functional requirements by writing down scenarios about how using it delivers value to its actors. However, writing effective use cases is more difficult than expected because you frequently must deal with difficult questions, such as: scope, level of detail needed for different people and projects, how to describe external interfaces, stored data, and more. You need a source of objective criteria to judge use case quality and effectiveness. Fill this critical information gap with a pattern language that provides simple, elegant, and proven solutions to common problems in use case development. Take away these use case patterns and profit from the knowledge and experience of other successful use case writers. And develop a new vocabulary for describing the properties of quality use cases.

  • The "signs of quality" and properties of a good use case
Steve Adolph, WSA Consulting Inc.
Software Test Automation Spring 2003: Mission Made Possible: A Lightweight Test Automation Experience

Using a challenging client engagement as a case study, Rex Black shows you how he and a team of test engineers created an integrated, automated unit, component, and integration testing harness, and a lightweight process for using it. The test harness supported both static and dynamic testing of a product that ran on multiple platforms. The test process allowed system development teams spread across three continents to test their own units before checking them into the code repository, while the capture of the tests provided automated integration testing and component regression going forward. He'll also explain the tools available to build such a testing harness and why his team chose the ones they did.

  • Examine the benefits-and challenges-of implementing an integrated, automated component and integration testing process in a Java/EJB development environment
Rex Black, Rex Black Consulting Services, Inc.

Pages

StickyMinds is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.