Melissa Benua, engineering manager at mParticle, discusses the role that containers play in test environments. She answers questions like: Why do you need containers? How is your team going to benefit from containers? What is the first step in getting started with containers? Melissa provides resources for learning how to make a container and on how containers will aid you in maintaining control over data and code.

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The Latest

Cursor hovering over the word "Security" on a computer screen Integrating Security and Testing Practices[article]

QA and information security use different methods to approach the same goals. When both groups work together, they can make a greater impact on the security of our products. Here's how the QA team can collaborate with infosec to implement strong security standards, prioritize what to test, and obtain quicker feedback on processes, ultimately seeing fewer production incidents related to security.

Sylvia Killinen's picture Sylvia Killinen
Brain made of computer circuits and binary code A Simpler Way of Using Machine Learning to Shift Testing Left[article]

The advantages of shifting left and testing as early as possible are obvious. But as you automate more testing, the test suite grows larger and larger, and it takes longer and longer to run. Instead, just automate the process of finding the right set of tests to run. The key to that is machine learning. This isn't AI bots finding bugs autonomously without creating tests; this is a different way to use machine learning, and it’s far simpler.

James Farrier's picture James Farrier
Score being shown at a baseball game More Than a Score: Taking a Deeper Dive into Your Metrics[article]

One key benefit of metrics is that they can be measured using a standard process; we can explain the numbers, and leadership can understand what that means. The downside is that it is only a measurement, so issues can easily hide until they become problems, and great work can also go unrepresented. Sporting events are a great example: The end score tells you who won, but not the details of the game. We need to look deeper.

Nels Hoenig's picture Nels Hoenig
Pyramid in Egypt Inverting the Test Automation Pyramid[article]

A growing company was tasked to develop a test automation program from scratch, change its coding practices, and build a continuous testing toolchain. Martin Ivison details how they did it, including realizing that implementing the traditional test pyramid wasn't going to work—it would have to be turned upside down. They found out that small is beautiful, cheap is good, and cultural change matters.

Martin Ivison's picture Martin Ivison
Artificial intelligence bot AI-Driven Test Automation and Your Future[article]

Many software testers are lamenting the impending demise of their jobs thanks to artificial intelligence. But Jon Hagar thinks there's no need to panic just yet. Here, he details some capabilities he's seen in AI, relates how these can be used in software testing, and explains why he thinks most people don't have to worry—although he also explains who should! As usual, it comes down to a willingness to learn new things.

Jon Hagar's picture Jon Hagar

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