Testing from Use Cases Using Path Analysis Technique

[article]
Summary:

Out of sheer necessity and in the absence of any defined methodology, the author devised a testing methodology called Use Case Path Analysis. This methodology has been successfully applied to test two EJB based projects at Fannie Mae. The author has also been involved in teaching this to a number of testing professionals and would like to share it with others.

Use cases have become an industry standard method of specifying user interaction with the system and hence have become part of the requirements definition phase of a software project. Use cases are used to derive, construct, and validate interfaces, objects, relationships, and processes in an application. T

hey can also be very effectively used for derivation of test cases for the software application. The author has been involved in a number of software projects, which were use case driven and was required to come up with test cases to effectively test the application.

Out of sheer necessity and in the absence of any defined methodology, the author devised a testing methodology called Use Case Path Analysis. This methodology has been successfully applied to test two EJB based projects at Fannie Mae. The author has also been involved in teaching this to a number of testing professionals and would like to share it with others.

About the author

Naresh Ahlowalia's picture Naresh Ahlowalia

Naresh Ahlowalia has more than twenty years of experience in software development, software testing, and systems testing. He has worked on many different tools like Rational, Mercury, and McCabe. Besides commercial applications, he has worked on military and avionics systems. He has interests in all aspects of software testing, including automation and performance testing. He is experienced in waterfall as well as incremental and iterative lifecycle methodologies. He has developed an approach for analyzing and testing from use cases, called Use Case Path Analysis. This graphical approach helps determine the use cases flow problems and also derive test cases from the use cases. This technique has been effectively used in two projects at Fannie Mae. Both projects were successfully put in production and were finished on time and within budget.

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