Measuring the Complexity and Impact of Design Changes

[article]
Summary:

Methods, such as McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity, have proven that complexity is a reliable predictor of defects. Although several methods exist to measure current system complexity, by using the Weighted Stability Index (WSI) Metric Model the potential impact of design changes can be weighted and measured. This provides a method to judge, and plan, for the potential stability impact from system changes.

Methods, such as McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity, have proven that complexity is a reliable predictor of defects. Although several methods exist to measure current system complexity, by using the Weighted Stability Index (WSI) Metric Model the potential impact of design changes can be weighted and measured. This provides a method to judge, and plan, for the potential stability impact from system changes.

About the author

Mike Libassi's picture Mike Libassi

After serving eight years in the U.S. Navy, Mike Libassi was employed by Intel Corp., in 1995, starting on the manufacturing floor. He also worked in metrology for a year. After gathering enough experience, he then moved into a quality engineering group. His next move was into a software testing position in Chandler, Arizona. After working one year in quality engineering and attending two years of night school, in 1998, Mike received a bachelors degree in information systems from the University of Phoenix. After graduation, Mike worked as a software tester for two years, performing roles with automated testing and metrics. During the past four years at Intel, quality and metrics have been a part of Mike’s job function. Currently, Mike’s position at Intel Corp. involves driving software metrics for the Capacity and Execution Systems Department.

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